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Android Leftovers

Some negativism from ZDNet

Patches for Android

  • Google Outs Android Security Patch for December 2019, More Than 40 Flaws Fixed

    Google has released today the Android Security Patch for December 2019 for its latest Android 10 mobile operating system series to address some of the most critical security vulnerabilities.
    Consisting of the 2019-12-01 and 2019-12-05 security patch levels, the Android Security Patch for December 2019 addresses a total of 42 security flaws across various Android components, including Android Framework, Media framework, Android System, Kernel components, as well as Qualcomm components, including closed-source ones.

    The most critical security issues fixed in this update affects the Framework component and could allow a remote attacker to cause a permanent denial of service. Also patched is a flaw that could allow a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code within the context of a privileged process by using a specially crafted file, and a vulnerability that could let a local attacker with privileged access to gain access to sensitive data.

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