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Tails 4.1 is out

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Security
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Debian

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Also: Tails 4.1 Anonymous OS Released with Latest Tor Browser, Linux Kernel 5.3.9

More in Tux Machines

Review: OpenIndiana 2019.10 Hipster

For me, the conclusion after battling with OpenIndiana for a few weeks is quite simple: the operating system's aim is to "ensure the continued availability of an openly developed distribution based on OpenSolaris" and it clearly achieves that goal. However, it does very little beyond that modest aim, and the lack of documentation makes it difficult to use OpenIndiana for people unfamiliar with OpenSolaris and/or Solaris. My advice for Linux users like me is to take plenty of time to get familiar with the operating system. At times I found using OpenIndiana hugely frustrating but that was largely because things weren't working as I expected. I am fairly confident that I would have solved most of the issues I encountered if I had spent more time with OpenIndiana. Some issues may be show-stoppers, including OpenIndiana's struggle with connecting to wireless networks and the limited amount of applications that are available. Many of these issues can be solved though. One of the main struggles I faced was finding documentation. The best place to look for information appears to be Oracle's Solaris documentation. Unfortunately, OpenIndiana's Hipster Handbook is not much use. It is mostly populated with content placeholders and the section on web servers counts exactly two words: "Apache" and "nginx". Even new features, such as the "native and metadata encryption" for ZFS and an option to disable hyper-treading are not mentioned in the handbook. At times OpenIndiana felt like an operating system that belongs in a museum. The set-up is quite old-school, the theme looks very dated and everything felt sluggish; the system is slow to boot and launching applications always took just a little too long for my liking. OpenIndiana's stand-out features are also nothing new - they are what made OpenSolaris a powerful operating system a decade years ago. Yet, in the Linux world there aren't many distros - if any - that have something like the Time Slider. openSUSE comes close but, in my humble opinion, OpenIndiana's Time Slider is more advanced and easier to use than OpenSUSE's Snapper. I am hoping Linux will catch up when it comes to OpenIndiana's ZFS goodness. Ubuntu is working on integrating ZFS, and I for one hope that in time there will be a Time Slider in file managers such as GNOME Files and Dolphin. Read more

OpenWiFi Open-Source Linux-compatible WiFi Stack Runs on FPGA Hardware

WiFi is omnipresent on most connected hardware, and when it works it’s great, but when there are issues oftentimes they can not be solved because the firmware is a closed-source binary. Read more

Analyzing Cinnamon keyboard shortcuts

Hello yet again, once again! For those who are not acquainted with this series, I am in an endeavor to analyze keyboard shortcuts in most major DEs so that we, the KDE community, can decide on the best defaults for KDE Plasma. Last time I analyzed MATE, and before that, XFCE. This time we analyze Cinnamon, a non-keyboard-driven environment that quite surprised me. I didn’t recall it was the case (I’ve used Cinnamon as a replacement for Windows 7 for some time in an old machine), but Cinnamon is actually quite similar to Plasma. It has quite surprised me, but this will stay for another day. One thing of note I will do on my next post in the series will be breaking the order I’ve followed until now for which DE to analyze, which was the list I made on the Phabricator task which is being tracked in this blog series. This is so because we’re close to Plasma 5.18, which is an important milestone to KDE—it will be an LTS version which should likely ship with LTS Kubuntu. Thus, I’ll focus first on keyboard-driven environments and speed things up for quicker decision-making. Oh, and I’ve had my birthday on the 12th of December! As a treat to myself, I tweaked the blog a bit. Weirdly enough, if I schedule my posts correctly, this post should be up three days after my birthday, the next should be three days prior to christmas and the next should be three days prior to New Year’s eve! Read more

Best MySQL Clients for Ubuntu

MySQL is very popular and one of the most widely used relational database management systems. Written in C and C++, it was developed and released by Oracle Corporation in mid 1995. Since then its popularity has only one direction i.e. northwards. Reason behind ever increasing popularity is that it is open-source and very easy to use, and integrates with various web apps and tools very easily. LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) is very popular combination and a backbone of various popular applications. There are many MySQL GUI clients for Windows users but if you’re working on Ubuntu then in this article I’m going to introduce you to the 5 best MySQL clients that you can use on Ubuntu and other Linux distributions. Read more