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ARM Linux on AWS

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  • Amazon Talks Up Big Performance Gains For Their 7nm Graviton2 CPUs

    If Amazon's numbers are accurate, Graviton2 should deliver a big performance boost for Amazon's ARM Linux cloud potential. Graviton2 processors are 7nm designs making use of Arm Neoverse cores. Amazon says they can deliver up to seven times the performance of current A1 instances, twice the FP performance, and support more memory channels as well as doubling the per-core cache.

  • AWS announces new ARM-based instances with Graviton2 processors

    AWS has been working with operating system vendors and independent software vendors to help them release software that runs on ARM. ARM-based EC2 instances support Amazon Linux 2, Ubuntu, Red Hat, SUSE, Fedora, Debian and FreeBSD. It also works with multiple container services (Docker, Amazon ECS, and Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service).

  • Coming Soon – Graviton2-Powered General Purpose, Compute-Optimized, & Memory-Optimized EC2 Instances

    We launched the first generation (A1) of Arm-based, Graviton-powered EC2 instances at re:Invent 2018. Since that launch, thousands of our customers have used them to run many different types of scale-out workloads including containerized microservices, web servers, and data/log processing.

  • AWS EC2 6th Gen Arm Instances are 7x Faster thanks to Graviton 2 Arm Neoverse N1 Custom Processor

    Last year Amazon introduced their first 64-bit Arm-based ECS2 “A1” instances which were found to deliver up to 45% cost savings over x86 Instances for the right workloads.

  • AWS launches Braket, its quantum computing service

    With Braket, developers can get started on building quantum algorithms and basic applications and then test them in simulations on AWS, as well as the quantum hardware from its partners. That’s a smart move on AWS’s part, as it’s hedging its bets without incurring the cost of trying to build a quantum computer itself. And for its partners, AWS provides them with the kind of reach that would be hard to achieve otherwise. Developers and researchers, on the other hand, get access to all of these tools through a single interface, making it easier for them to figure out what works best for them.

ARM+Linux and Amazon Linux

    • AWS announces new ARM-based instances with Graviton2 processors

      AWS, the cloud division of Amazon, just announced the next generation of its ARM processors, the Graviton2. This is a custom chip design with a 7nm architecture. It is based on 64-bit ARM Neoverse cores.

      Compared to first-generation Graviton processors (A1), today’s new chips should deliver up to 7x the performance of A1 instances in some cases. Floating point performance is now twice as fast. There are additional memory channels and cache speed memory access should be much faster.

      The company is working on three types of Graviton2 EC2 instances that should be available soon. Instances with a “g” suffix are powered by Graviton2 chips. If they have a “d” suffix, it also means that they have NVMe local storage.

    • Gravitons reign, yo: A screaming comes across the sky and all across the Neoverse

      The first generation of Arm-based EC2 servers, dubbed A1, used AWS's Graviton1 processor line, which debuted a year ago. Based on 16 64-bit Arm Cortex-A72 cores clocked at 2.3GHz, they were designed to provide cost savings over x86-based microprocessors for specific applications like web servers, microservices, data and log processing, and other workloads suited to small cores and limited memory requirements.

    • Finally: AWS Gives Servers A Real Shot In The Arm

      Finally, we get to test out how well or poorly a well-designed Arm server chip will do in the datacenter. And we don’t have to wait for any of the traditional and upstart server chip makers to convince server partners to build and support machines, and the software partners to get on board and certify their stacks and apps to run on the chip. Amazon Web Services is an ecosystem unto itself, and it owns a lot of its own stack, so it can just mike drop the Graviton2 processor on the stage at re:Invent in Las Vegas and dare Marvell, Ampere, and anyone else who cares to try to keep up.

    • Datacoral announces HIPAA compliance, Data & Analytics competency and Amazon Linux 2 certification

      Today at AWS re:Invent, Datacoral, a provider of data pipeline infrastructure, announced three newly achieved AWS and government standard milestones that reinforce long term commitments to data security and AWS best practices. Datacoral has achieved HIPAA compliance, earned its Data & Analytics competency as an APN Advanced Technology Partner, and certified their support for Amazon Linux 2.

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