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Xbox cable danger resurfaces

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Microsoft

Microsoft must be kicking themselves or those manufacturing their Xbox console this morning, after it was discovered the cable issue from earlier this year has resurfaced in much younger models of the Xbox than previously realised. Once again attempting to head-off a PR debacle, Redmond are responsibly offering all gamers in the UK and Ireland with an Xbox made prior to January 14th 2005 a brand new power cable gratis. Xbox Officer Robbie Bach has sent a letter to owners, and in it he informs us that in about twenty cases the power cord has caused damage to a carpet or the Xbox itself. It was originally thought that this problem was only prevalent in very early Xbox's, and that the issue had since been ironed-out.

"We have recently determined that in the UK and Republic of Ireland a small number of consoles manufactured between October 23, 2003 and January 14, 2005, require a new replacement cord as well," read Bach's apologetic letter. The power cable can be replaced by registering on Xbox.com for a new one, or by calling 0800 0289276. It is unclear whether other PAL regions are effected by this ongoing danger, but we'll keep you posted. New cables should take two to four weeks to be delivered, and gamers should keep their console unplugged whilst not in use in the meantime. More soon.

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