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Disney+ Now Works on Linux, No Workarounds Required

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Linux

Disney launched its new video streaming service in the USA and Canada last month to much hype and attention (it scores 10 million subscribers in the first day alone).

But many Linux users in those countries who’d been hoping to tune in to watch shows like The Mandalorian and High School Musical: The Musical: The Series were left disappointed.

For although rival streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime work “out of the box” on Linux in web browsers like Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox, Disney+ didn’t.

Read more

The Curse of Outdated DRM Claims Another Victim

  • The Curse of Outdated DRM Claims Another Victim, 'Tron: Evolution'

    As of this week, players who owned a legitimate copy of Tron: Evolution they paid for but never played it, no longer can. Tron: Evolution, a tie-in game for the 2010 Tron: Legacy film , used SecurRom, a form of digital rights management (DRM), and publisher Disney hasn’t paid its bill. This means Disney can no longer authenticate purchases and "unlock" copies of the game that people bought but haven't used yet.

    Players first noticed they couldn’t play the game after purchasing it in October, but a thread on Reddit today brought more attention to the issue.

    “I often buy games on sales, but don't play them immediately,” user Renusek said on Reddit. “Yesterday I decided to play Tron: Evolution, maybe even practice speedrunning it, so I install the game, try to activate it (game still uses SecuROM DRM) and... the serial key has expired (?!).”

Disney+ Now Works in Linux After DRM Tweak

  • Disney+ Now Works in Linux After DRM Tweak

    Linux users can now stream shows and movies from the Disney+ streaming service after Disney lowering the level of their DRM requirements.

    When Disney+ was first launched, Linux users who attempted to watch shows and movies were shown an error stating "Something went wrong. Please try again. If the problem persists, visit the Disney+ Help Center (Error Code 83)."

Disney+ finally works on Linux!

  • Disney+ finally works on Linux!

    A little more than three weeks after the new Disney+ movie streaming service went officially live, the Disney company has added Linux support to their Widevine DRM protection. No more “Error 83”. No more need to install the Windows version of Chrome in Wine. Watching your favorite movies is now possible in the native Linux browsers – both Mozilla and Google based. Firefox will download the Widevine CDM (content delivery module) automatically, Chrome has the support built-in and for my Chromium package and other Chromium-based browsers you;ll have to install my chromium-widevine-plugin package.

Goodbye Error 83: You Can Now Stream Disney Plus on Linux Device

  • Goodbye Error 83: You Can Now Stream Disney Plus on Linux Devices

    Prior to Disney+ launching, there was some speculation that the service wouldn’t work on Chromebook or Linux Devices. Those streaming on certain devices during the test in the Netherlands received an Error 83 which meant a “device compatibility issue.” This was a result of how Disney+ handled Widevine DRM and the fact that Disney+ required a higher level of security than other streaming services like Netflix and Hulu.

    While Disney was able to add Chromebook support ahead of launch (which is good because, you get 3 free months when you buy one), some Linux devices still did not support the streaming service. But now, according to many Linux users, earlier this week that changed.

You Can Now Stream Disney+ On Linux Computers

  • You Can Now Stream Disney+ On Linux Computers

    With Disney+ now lowering the DRM requirements, Linux users should be able to watch their favorite shows like The Mandalorian and High School Musical: The Musical: The Series.

    In order to stream the Disney+ service on Linux devices, users need to ensure that DRM is enabled in their browser.

Disney's Decision Not To Renew SecuROM License Bricks...

  • Disney's Decision Not To Renew SecuROM License Bricks 'Tron: Evolution'

    Show of hands: who remembers SecuROM? Alright, put your hands down, we can't see each other anyway. So, SecuROM was a really bad DRM used by several publishers to "protect" video games, by which I mean it mostly just annoyed legitimate buyers, got some of those publishers sued, and ultimately made the game unplayable on modern operating systems. The track record is enough to make you wonder why anyone would use DRM at all after this whole debacle.

Now You can Stream Disney+ On Linux Operating Systems

Linux Users Can Now Use Disney+ After DRM Fix

  • Linux Users Can Now Use Disney+ After DRM Fix

    When Disney+ was first launched, Linux users who attempted to watch shows and movies were shown an error stating "Something went wrong. Please try again. If the problem persists, visit the Disney+ Help Center (Error Code 83)."

    As explained by Hans de Goede, this error was being caused by the Disney+ service using the highest level of security for the Widevine Digital Rights Management (DRM) technology. As some Linux and Android devices did not support this higher DRM security level, they were unable to stream Disney+ shows in their browsers... Yesterday, Twitter users discovered that Disney+ had suddenly started working on Linux browsers after the streaming service tweaked their DRM security levels...

Linux users can now enjoy Disney+

  • Linux users can now enjoy Disney+

    When Disney+ launched, Linux users were shut out. Attempting to stream content resulted in an error message reading: "Something went wrong. Please try again. If the problem persists, visit the Disney+ Help Center (Error Code 83)."

    The problem stemmed from the way in which Disney chose to implement digital rights management but now the company has tweaked the way DRM is used, lowering the security settings it had in place, meaning that it is now possible to enjoy Disney+ on Linux.

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