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today's leftovers

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  • 2019-12-05 | Linux Headlines

    Mozilla speeds up its open source speech-to-text engine, Disney+ is now available on Linux, and Amazon has a new AI-powered service for automated code review.

  • Linux 5.5 Lands Broadcom BCM2711 / Raspberry Pi 4 Bits

    Following last week's Arm architecture updates for Linux 5.5, sent in via four pull requests on Thursday was all the new and improved hardware enablement for the SoCs and single-board computer platforms.

    The prominent ARM hardware support change with Linux 5.5 is mainlining the Broadcom BCM2711 SoC that is notably used by the Raspberry Pi 4 and also integrating the various RPi4 device tree additions. It's great seeing the Linux kernel finally beginning to get into shape for the modern Raspberry Pi 4.

  • Krita Weekly #6

    I will just run through what are the folks did over the week. Dmitry is working on fixing the rendering of vector shapes. I gave it a try last day, though there are a few snitches here and there, but overall it was much faster than the current one. He also worked with a new contributor Fredrik and fixed the transform tool crash bug.

    Kai Uwe Broulik fixed almost year old regression which made the layer filter menu too narrow with the breeze theme. Tiar fixed a couple of bugs related to onion skins and selections along with her work on the implement tagging of resources in the new system. Also Wolthera can be seen working on the UI and resource models for the same. Ivan has finished his patch to accurately draw 1px lines. Amidst exams even I patched one of the bugs related to text tool, although I was the one who introduced that in the first place.

  • elementary OS 5.1 "Hera" overview | The fast, open, and privacy-respecting replacement for Windows.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of elementary OS 5.1 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Zombies Ate Your Neighbors? Tell Everyone Through LoRa

    As popular as the post-apocalyptic Zombie genre is, there is a quite unrealistic component to most of the stories. Well, apart from the whole “the undead roaming the Earth” thing. But where are the nerds, and where is all the apocalypse-proof, solar-powered tech? Or is it exactly this lack of tech in those stories that serves as incentive to build it in the first place? Well, maybe it doesn’t have to be the end of the world to seek for ways to cope with a collapse of our modern communication infrastructure either. Just think of natural disasters — an earthquake or hurricane causing a long-term power outage for example. The folks at [sudomesh] tackle exactly this concern with their fully open source, off-grid, solar-powered, LoRa mesh network, Disaster Radio.

    The network itself is built from single nodes comprising of a battery-backed solar panel, a LoRa module, and either the ESP8266 or ESP32 for WiFi connectivity. The idea is to connect to the network with your mobile phone through WiFi, therefore eliminating any need for additional components to actually use the network, and have the nodes communicate with each other via LoRa. Admittedly, LoRa may not be your best choice for high data rates, but it is a good choice for long-range communication when cellular networks aren’t an option. And while you can built it all by yourself with everything available on [sudomesh]’s GitHub page, a TTGO ESP32 LoRa module will do as well.

  • Jakub Steiner: Conferences

    This year I haven’t done any drone-related travelling. The sponsorship deal fell through and Rotorama didn’t participate in DCL. I admit I haven’t been practicing as much as I would need to to do any better in the local races either.

    So at least I got the world of FOSS to get out of the couch.

  • A Major Step for Open Source in Europe

    As long-time supporters of Open Source, we had high expectations of last week’s European Commission ambitious workshop ‘Open Source Beyond 2020’. These expectations were exceeded. The event gathered an impressive group of representatives of the relevant stakeholder groups, spanning industry, research, advocacy, and policy-making. But what was particularly encouraging was the way the Commission actively sought fresh ideas on how the Open Source opportunity for Europe could be maximised. 

    It was helpful that DG CNECT and DIGIT jointly hosted the event, bringing together their experiences and initiatives. Two intensive days of insightful panels and discussions with practitioners from around Europe gave a strong feeling of pragmatism rather than rhetoric. 

    Contributing to the Workshop CEO Sachiko Muto spoke on the role of Open Source as innovation enabler and the role of Standards in Open Source, and our research director Sivan Pätsch shared his insights on digital skills for Open Source. But it was particularly pleasing to see many of the OpenForum Academy Fellows giving expert opinion.

    Open Source has reached global ubiquity within software development so it is fundamental that Europe understands how to maximise the potential impact for economic development, business and citizens. The European Commission employed a proactive approach when it came to listening to the broad community in planning and delivering the workshop. This holds high hopes for the future of digital openness in Europe and possibilities of cross-industry and cross-institutional cooperation. But to date much of the success has come from bottom up initiatives. Just what are the policy and leadership measures that the Commission could take that would positively affect the outcome? Are there any? Are they really needed?

  • Google to stop indexing Flash for search

    Adobe laid out Flash's demise two years ago when it disclosed that it would stop updating and distributing Flash Player at the end of 2020. At the same time, browser makers revealed how they were going to sunset the player software and thus put an end to the multimedia format.

    [...]

    Shutting down Flash indexing will impact only a fraction of all websites: According to technology survey site W3Techs, only 3% of sites now utilize Flash code. That number climbs when more popular sites are polled; 8.4% of the top-1,000 sites, said W3Techs, contain Flash code.

  • The 20 Best Ride Sharing Apps for Android Device in 2019

    Using a ride sharing app on your Android device now becomes very common. With the blessing, we call PlayStore, life in this era, has become easier than before. Those taxi apps for Android devices are such an issue that vanishes all the hassles of hiring a vehicle in a familiar and even in an unfamiliar place. However, PlayStore contains thousands of taxi apps. But all of them may not work well for you. Moreover, all those apps are not available everywhere. This is why I suggest you have an idea about some best ride sharing apps for Android before giving a try on some.

  • New Vivaldi for Android Beta Adds More UI Improvements, Chromebook Support

    Vivaldi Technologies have released a new beta of their upcoming Vivaldi for Android web browser, which brings support for Chromebooks and many refinements to the user interface.
    After the great feedback on the first beta release, Vivaldi Technologies have been working hard to improve their Vivaldi for Android web browser, adding lots of goodies requested by the community, starting with new settings to allow users to swipe to close tabs and view scrollbars on internal pages.

    Another new setting added in Vivaldi for Android beta 2 is called "Always Show Desktop Site," which will display the desktop version of the current website when enabled. The UI has been refreshed as well to get rid of Bookmarks and Notes with a single tap using the new "Empty Trash" button at the bottom of the screen.

    "We want Vivaldi to be a great experience for our users on their mobile devices," says Vivaldi CEO Jon von Tetzchner. "And we are working towards packing more functionality into it based on their invaluable feedback."

  • Intel Publishes oneAPI Level 0 Specification

    Back at SC19 Intel released a beta of their oneAPI Base Toolkit for software developers to work on performance-optimized, cross-device software. Complementing that initial software beta is now the oneAPI Level 0 Specification. 

    The oneAPI Level 0 Specification is self-described as "The objective of the ‘One API’ Level-Zero API is to provide direct-to-metal interfaces to offload accelerator devices. It is a programming interface that can be published at a cadence that better matches Intel hardware releases and can be tailored to any device needs. It can be adapted to support broader set of languages features, such as function pointers, virtual functions, unified memory, and I/O capabilities." 

    [...]

    While catering to Intel hardware releases, the specification itself is under the Creative Commons and the actual implementation of it under an MIT license, thus the ability for other ISVs and IHVs to embrace the oneAPI specification. Similarly, we've already heard of Codeplay working on oneAPI support for NVIDIA GPUs to be released in 2020. 

  • Python libraries imitating ‘dateutil’ and ‘jellyfish’ caught stealing SSH and GPG keys

    Both of the malicious libraries were discovered earlier this month by Lukas Martini, a German software developer. The libraries were removed the same day as Martini notified the Python security team.

    Fortunately, thanks to Martini’s quick observation, the python3-dateutil library was only live for two days. jeIlyfish, however, was live for almost a year (since December 11, 2018).

  • [Older] Making sense of a multi-cloud, hybrid world at KubeCon

    More than 12,000 attendees gathered this week in San Diego to discuss all things containers, Kubernetes and cloud-native at KubeCon.

    Kubernetes, the container orchestration tool, turned five this year, and the technology appears to be reaching a maturity phase where it accelerates beyond early adopters to reach a more mainstream group of larger business users.

    That’s not to say that there isn’t plenty of work to be done, or that most enterprise companies have completely bought in, but it’s clearly reached a point where containerization is on the table. If you think about it, the whole cloud-native ethos makes sense for the current state of computing and how large companies tend to operate.

  • [Older] ‘Kubernetes’ Is the Future of Computing. What You Should Know About the New Trend.

    Nearly all major technology companies are saying the same thing. Kubernetes is the next big thing in computing.

    The Greek word for helmsman or pilot, Kubernetes is accelerating the transition away for legacy client-server technology by making cloud-native software development easier, better and faster.

    Last week, more than 12,000 developers and executives gathered in San Diego at the largest annual Kubernetes conference called KubeCon. That’s up from just 550 attendees four years ago. The conference goers are all looking for ways to take advantage of Kubernetes and its ability to automatically deploy, manage, and scale software workloads in the cloud.

    To understand the trend, let’s start with the changing dynamics of software in the cloud. Cloud apps increasingly run in aptly-named containers. The containers hold an application, its settings, and other related instructions. The trick is that these containers aren’t tied down to one piece of hardware and can run nearly anywhere—across different servers and clouds. It’s how Google manages to scale Gmail and Google Maps across a billion-plus users.

    Alphabet’s (ticker: GOOGL) Google long ago developed software called Borg to orchestrate its in-house containers—spinning them up and down as needed. In 2014, the search giant opted to make a version of Borg open source, calling it Kubernetes. Today, the major cloud providers all offer a Kubernetes option to customers.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

After South Korea, Polish Government Increases Use Of Linux

In addition to the recent full-scale shift to Linux by South Korea, the Polish state organization has also signed a three-year support contract with Linux Polska for its IT systems. Poland’s social insurance company, ZUS (Zakład Ubezpieczeń Społecznych), announced the agreement with Linux Polska to obtain 24×7 support for integrated Linux server virtualization. Read more

today's howtos

Programming: Golang, Perl, Python and the GCC Story

  • 9 Reasons You Should Use Golang Language

    Golang is the open-source programming language developed by Google in the year 2007. Several programming languages are present in the market with advantages and disadvantages. We cannot predict which language is better, it would take months to discuss. However, the most sensible thing that helps choose a better language is the one that suits a specific purpose more reliably than the others. Thus, Golang development will be most suitable for those who are willing to combine simplicity, concurrency, and safety of the code. Different programming languages are less memory efficient and are unable to communicate with the hardware. Therefore, Golang is one of the most preferred languages for developers that help build software. It is also the open-source and procedural language that is advantageous to deploy simple, effective, and reliable software. Go language aids the environment to adopt different patterns that are similar to dynamic languages. Go language has several advantages that are responsible to quicken the development process. Moreover, Golang is the language that makes the process of software development easy and simple for programmers. These days, Golang is gaining popularity amongst the developers as it has a plethora of advantages than the other programming languages. So, the use of Golang has been adopted by mobile app development companies.

  • Demonstrating PERL with Tic-Tac-Toe, Part 1

    PERL is a procedural programming language. A program written in PERL consists of a series of commands that are executed sequentially. With few exceptions, most commands alter the state of the computer’s memory in some way. Line 00 in the Tic-Tac-Toe program isn’t technically part of the PERL program and it can be omitted. It is called a shebang (the letter e is pronounced soft as it is in the word shell). The purpose of the shebang line is to tell the operating system what interpreter the remaining text should be processed with if one isn’t specified on the command line. Line 02 isn’t strictly necessary for this program either. It makes available an advanced command named state. The state command creates a variable that can retain its value after it has gone out of scope. I’m using it here as a way to avoid declaring a global variable. It is considered good practice in computer programming to avoid using global variables where possible because they allow for action at a distance. If you didn’t follow all of that, don’t worry about it. It’s not important at this point.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 048: Survivor and Palindrome Dates

    I tried two different approaches to the problem. The first one uses an array of living people and a variable $sword that stores the index of the person holding the sword. In each iteration of the loop, the next person is removed from the array, and the sword is passed to the next person. The “next person” has a special cyclic meaning: at the end of the array, the sword must return to the beginning. This is achieved by using the modulo operator %. Note that we use it twice, once to find the person to kill, and once to find the person to pass the sword to—and each case uses a different array size in the modulo operation, as killing a person changes the size of the array.

  • My Unexpected Dive into Open-Source Python

    I'm very happy to announce that I have joined Quansight as a front-end developer and designer! It was a happy coincidence how I joined- the intersection of my skills and the open source community's expanded vision. I met Ralf Gommers, the director of Quansight Labs, at the PyData Conference in New York City last year after giving a Lightning Talk. However, as cool and confident as this may sound, I sure didn't start off that way. At that point, it's been a few months since I graduated from a coding bootcamp. I was feeling down in the job-search funk. I hadn't even done much in Python, since my focus was in Javascript.

  • Reposurgeon defeats all monsters!

    On January 12th 2020, reposurgeon performed a successful conversion of its biggest repository ever – the entire history of the GNU Compiler Collection, 280K commits with a history stretching back through 1987. Not only were some parts CVS, the earliest portions predated CVS and had been stored in RCS. I waited this long to talk about it to give the dust time to settle on the conversion. But it’s been 5 weeks now and I’ve heard nary a peep from the GCC developers about any problems, so I think we can score this as reposurgeon’s biggest victory yet. The Go port really proved itself. Those 280K commits can be handled on the 128GB Great Beast with a load time of about two hours. I have to tell the Go garbage collector to be really aggressive – set GOGC=30 – but that’s exactly what GOGC is for.