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OSS: Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), Animal Vision, Outreachy and LibreOffice

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OSS
  • US 2020 Election Security: Auditing Tool Coming Soon

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) said it is working with a non-partisan, non-profit group to customize an open source, post-election auditing tool to verify votes in the upcoming 2020 elections.

    The tool is known as Arlo. VotingWorks, an organization focused on developing secure election technology, is CISA’s partner. Arlo is used to conduct risk-limited audits (RLA), which VotingWorks calls the “best safeguard we have against hacked or otherwise faulty voting systems.” In an RLA, Arlo determines how many ballots to count, selects which ballots to inspect and compares audited votes to tabulated votes. Election officials in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Virginia, Ohio and Georgia are currently piloting the software and others are expected to join. Colorado became the first state to implement RLAs when in 2017 it audited one race in each of 50 of its 64 counties.

  • New machine learning from Alibaba and Netflix, mimicking animal vision, and more open source news

    Have you ever wondered how your dog or cat sees the world? Thanks to work by researchers at the University of Exeter in the UK and Australia's University of Queensland, you can find out. The team just released software that allows humans to see the world as animals do.

    Called micaToolbox, the software can interpret digital photos and process images of various environments by mimicking the limitations of animal vision. Anyone with a camera, a computer, or smartphone can use the software without knowing how to code. But micaToolbox isn't just a novelty. It's a serious scientific tool that can help "help biologists better understand a variety of animal behaviors, including mating systems, distance-dependent signalling and mimicry." And, according to researcher Jolyon Troscianko, the software can help identify "how an animal's camouflage works so that we can manage our land to protect certain species."

  • Some Of The Interesting Open-Source Projects For Outreachy's Winter 2019 Round

    Outreachy recently kicked off their winter (December to March) round of internships for diversity in tech with 49 individuals tackling a range of open-source tasks.

    Complementing the useful contributions made this summer during their previous round, some more interesting tasks are being tackled over the next few months too. In going through the 49 projects, some of the interesting ones include:

    - Adding "did you mean?" hints to Git when entering incorrect sub-commands.

  • [LibreOffice] QA/Dev Report: November 2019

    585 bugs, 67 of which are enhancements, have been reported by 365 people.

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