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OSS: Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), Animal Vision, Outreachy and LibreOffice

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OSS
  • US 2020 Election Security: Auditing Tool Coming Soon

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) said it is working with a non-partisan, non-profit group to customize an open source, post-election auditing tool to verify votes in the upcoming 2020 elections.

    The tool is known as Arlo. VotingWorks, an organization focused on developing secure election technology, is CISA’s partner. Arlo is used to conduct risk-limited audits (RLA), which VotingWorks calls the “best safeguard we have against hacked or otherwise faulty voting systems.” In an RLA, Arlo determines how many ballots to count, selects which ballots to inspect and compares audited votes to tabulated votes. Election officials in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Virginia, Ohio and Georgia are currently piloting the software and others are expected to join. Colorado became the first state to implement RLAs when in 2017 it audited one race in each of 50 of its 64 counties.

  • New machine learning from Alibaba and Netflix, mimicking animal vision, and more open source news

    Have you ever wondered how your dog or cat sees the world? Thanks to work by researchers at the University of Exeter in the UK and Australia's University of Queensland, you can find out. The team just released software that allows humans to see the world as animals do.

    Called micaToolbox, the software can interpret digital photos and process images of various environments by mimicking the limitations of animal vision. Anyone with a camera, a computer, or smartphone can use the software without knowing how to code. But micaToolbox isn't just a novelty. It's a serious scientific tool that can help "help biologists better understand a variety of animal behaviors, including mating systems, distance-dependent signalling and mimicry." And, according to researcher Jolyon Troscianko, the software can help identify "how an animal's camouflage works so that we can manage our land to protect certain species."

  • Some Of The Interesting Open-Source Projects For Outreachy's Winter 2019 Round

    Outreachy recently kicked off their winter (December to March) round of internships for diversity in tech with 49 individuals tackling a range of open-source tasks.

    Complementing the useful contributions made this summer during their previous round, some more interesting tasks are being tackled over the next few months too. In going through the 49 projects, some of the interesting ones include:

    - Adding "did you mean?" hints to Git when entering incorrect sub-commands.

  • [LibreOffice] QA/Dev Report: November 2019

    585 bugs, 67 of which are enhancements, have been reported by 365 people.

More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.35.91 released! (GNOME 3.36 Beta 2)

  • GNOME 3.35.91 released!
    Hi,
    
    GNOME 3.35.91 is now available! This is the second beta release of GNOME 3.36.
    
    Please note: we are now in string freeze, so be kind to translators and stop changing strings.
    
    The corresponding flatpak runtimes have been published to Flathub. If you'd like to target the GNOME 3.36 platform, you can test your application against the 3.36beta branch of the Flathub Beta repository.
    
    You can also try the experimental VM image, available here for a limited time only:
    
    https://gitlab.gnome.org/GNOME/gnome-build-meta/-/jobs/598561/artifacts/file/image/disk.qcow2
    
    It needs a UEFI bios and a VirtIO GPU to run.
    
    If you want to compile GNOME 3.35.91 yourself, you can use the
    official BuildStream project snapshot:
    
    https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.35.91/gnome-3.35.91.tar.xz
    
    The list of updated modules and changes is available here:
    
    https://download.gnome.org/core/3.35/3.35.91/NEWS
    
    The source packages are available here:
    
    https://download.gnome.org/core/3.35/3.35.91/sources/
    
    
    WARNING!
    --------
    This release is a snapshot of development code. Although it is
    buildable and usable, it is primarily intended for testing and hacking
    purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development
    status.
    
    For more information about 3.36, the full schedule, the official module
    lists and the proposed module lists, please see our 3.35 wiki page:
    
    https://www.gnome.org/start/unstable
    
    Happy Tuesday,
    
    Michael
    
  • GNOME 3.36 Beta 2 Released With Initial Setup Parental Controls, Lock-Screen USB Disable

    GNOME 3.35.91 is out today as the second beta ahead of next month's GNOME 3.36 desktop release. The 3.35.91 release is the last stop before the GNOME 3.36 release candidate at month's end and then GNOME 3.36.0 should be debuting on 11 March. While past the UI and feature freeze since the 3.35.90 beta earlier this month, there are still some prominent changes to note with today's second beta:

  • GNOME 3.36 Desktop Gets Second Beta Release Ahead of March 11 Launch

    GNOME Project’s Michael Catanzaro just announced a few moments ago the availability of the second beta release of the upcoming GNOME 3.36 desktop environment. With only three weeks left until the final release on March 11th, the GNOME 3.36 desktop environment received today a new beta version, GNOME 3.35.91, which can be downloaded and installed on various GNU/Linux distributions using the official Flatpak runtimes from Flathub, the official BuildStream project snapshot, the experimental VM image, or the source packages. The development cycle of GNOME 3.36 is almost over and String Freeze stage is now in effect. There will be one more milestone published before the final release next month, GNOME 3.35.92 a.k.a. GNOME 3.36 Release Candidate (RC), which is expected at the end of the month on February 29th.

Android Leftovers

4 Ways to Kill Unresponsive Applications in Debian 10

It is often annoying when a program stops working and you cannot even close it. Rebooting the system is not always the appropriate way and we search for ways to get rid of unresponsive programs, easily and quickly. In this article, we will learn about those ways including both GUI and the command line to kill the unresponsive applications in a Debian system. We have run the commands and procedures mentioned in this article on a Debian 10 system. Some of the methods described here have been run on the command line Terminal application. To open the Terminal in Debian OS, go to the Activities tab in the top left corner of your desktop. Then in the search bar, type the keyword terminal. When the search result appears, click on the Terminal icon. Read more

MAAS 2.7 released

Following on from MAAS 2.6.2, we are happy to announce that MAAS 2.7 is now available. This release features some critical bug fixes, along with some exciting new features. For some time, our users have been asking for the capability to deploy CentOS 8 images in MAAS. With the advent of MAAS 2.7, that is now possible. The Images page in the MAAS 2.8 UI offers the option to select and download CentOS 8. It is important to note that users of previous versions may see CentOS 8 as an available option, but cannot download or deploy it. Read more