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Graphics News With Focus on Vulkan

  • The Open-Source Qualcomm "TURNIP" Vulkan Driver Adds Important Performance Feature

    The TURNIP Mesa Vulkan driver providing support for recent Qualcomm Adreno graphics processors and akin to the Freedreno Gallium3D driver has added an important performance-boosting feature.

    Thanks to Jonathan Marek who has been driving much of the TURNIP driver advancements in recent time is now hardware binning support. The nearly 400 lines of code implement hardware binning as an important performance sensitive feature.

  • ChamferWM Still Appears To Be The Most Capable Vulkan-Powered X11 Tiling Window Manager

    While we are approaching 2020 and the four year anniversary since the Vulkan 1.0 launch, one aspect that has been a bit disappointing has been the lack of not seeing quicker uptake by various Linux window managers / compositors in at least offering a Vulkan code path. One of the best examples of a Vulkan-powered compositor with that has been the independent ChamferWM.

  • Intel Jasper Lake Support Added To Mesa 20.0 OpenGL / Vulkan Drivers

    With Intel Jasper Lake graphics support making it as one of the prominent hardware support additions for Linux 5.5, the user-space OpenGL/Vulkan driver support is now found within Mesa 20.0-devel.

    Commits today added the Intel Jasper Lake support for Mesa 20.0. Though with Jasper Lake being "Gen 11" graphics like existing Ice Lake as well as Elkhart Lake, the Jasper Lake addition primarily comes down to adding the new PCI IDs and then following the same driver code paths as Elkhart Lake.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Open-spec SBC serves up 4k camera-oriented Allwinner V536 SoC

The open-spec “Lindenis V536” SBC runs Linux on the Cortex-A7-based Allwinner V536, a 4k camera-oriented SoC with integrated ISP and VPU. The 130 x 85mm SBC design is built in an SoM plus baseboard configuration. Lindenis Tech Ltd., a Shenzhen, China startup staffed by former Allwinner employees, has released the Lindenis V536, an open spec, single board computer based on Allwinner’s V536 4k mobile camera SoC. In August 2018, we covered a previous camera-oriented SBC from Lindenis, the Lindenis V5 based on the Allwinner’s V5 SoC. It’s only natural that the company would now follow up with this new open-spec 130 x 85mm SBC based on Allwinner’s new V536 SoC. The V536 SoC is a high-performance, low-power mobile camera SoC developed for the new generation of intelligent driving recorders. The Lindenis V536 board supports Linux-4.9 and its homegrown Lindenis Video OS. Read more

7 Best Free Web-Based Git Clients

Git is an open source distributed version control system which was originally designed by Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, in 2005 for Linux kernel development. This control system is widely used by the open source community, handling small to extremely large projects with an emphasis on speed and efficiency, but maintaining flexibility, scalability, and guaranteeing data integrity. Git is one of a number of open source revision control systems available for Linux. Other popular tools in this field include Subversion, Bazaar, Mercurial, Monotone, CVS, and SVN. However, Git is frequently regarded by many developers to be the finest version control tool available. Read more

Run multiple consoles at once with this open source window environment

Last year, I brought you 19 days of new (to you) productivity tools for 2019. This year, I'm taking a different approach: building an environment that will allow you to be more productive in the new year, using tools you may or may not already be using. Who remembers DESQview? It allowed for things in DOS we take for granted now in Windows, Linux, and MacOS—namely the ability to run and have multiple programs running onscreen at once. In my early days running a dial-up BBS, DESQview was a necessity—it enabled me to have the BBS running in the background while doing other things in the foreground. For example, I could be working on new features or setting up new external programs while someone was dialed in without impacting their experience. Later, in my early days in support, I could have my work email (DaVinci email on MHS), the support ticket system, and other DOS programs running all at once. It was amazing! Read more