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Microsoft Once Again Googlebombing "Linux" to Push/Promote Proprietary Spyware

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Microsoft

More Microsoft spin from Mary Jo Foley

Microsoft fake news

More of that "Office" slant

You look for "LINUX" news, you get proprietary software instead

Microsoft still googlebombing "Linux" a day later (for spyware)

More "Teams" Promotion Piggybacking "Linux"

3rd day of Googlebombing

  • Microsoft debuts its first native Office app for Linux

    The public preview (beta) of Microsoft Teams for Linux has landed, with packages in both .deb and .rpm formats, which should cover it for most flavours of your favourite open-source operating system.

  • How to install Microsoft Teams Linux on Ubuntu and CentOS
  • Microsoft Teams is Now Available on Linux

    The last time I talked about Working with Microsoft without a 3rd-party client was when we published on Hiri, a desktop email client for Microsoft and Hotmail. Although this was game-changing news in 2016, I’m happy to bring you news on one of 2019’s game-changers for developers.

    Microsoft Teams is a platform for unified communication and collaboration designed for workplace conversations, file storage, group video meetings, and application integration and it is now available for Linux users on any platform.

    This is the first time a Microsoft 365 app is coming to Linux desktops with all of its major features so we are all excited about it.

  • Microsoft Bringing Teams to Linux in Preview

Microsoft Brings First 365 Application to Linux Desktop

  • Microsoft Brings First 365 Application to Linux Desktop

    Slack meanwhile reports ” 5+ billion weekly actions”.

    (Its December 4 quarterly filing shows that the company has just over 105,000 aid customers, up 30 percent year-over-year, but the company continues to report substantial losses — $95.0 million for the quarter — despite strong growth.)

Even one week later

More of this stuff

  • Teams is now available on Linux as Microsoft’s first Office Linux app

    I genuinely hope this is the harbinger of the rest of Microsoft Office also finding its way to Linux natively. LibreOffice is workable in a pinch, but for proper compatibility nothing beats the real Office (sadly). I wouldn’t be surprised if Microsoft has long had Linux versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and so on, much like how Mac OS X has been running on Intel all along before Apple made the switch.

Microsoft Teams Now Available for Linux

  • Microsoft Teams Now Available for Linux

    Starting today, Microsoft Teams is available for Linux users in public preview, enabling collaboration experiences for the open source community at work and in educational institutions. Users can download the native Linux packages in .deb and .rpm formats here.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Mozilla: DNS/DoH, USA FREEDOM Act, Critiquing Design and Sandboxing

  • Firefox continues push to bring DNS over HTTPS by default for US users

    Today, Firefox began the rollout of encrypted DNS over HTTPS (DoH) by default for US-based users. The rollout will continue over the next few weeks to confirm no major issues are discovered as this new protocol is enabled for Firefox’s US-based users. A little over two years ago, we began work to help update and secure one of the oldest parts of the internet, the Domain Name System (DNS). To put this change into context, we need to briefly describe how the system worked before DoH. DNS is a database that links a human-friendly name, such as www.mozilla.org, to a computer-friendly series of numbers, called an IP address (e.g. 192.0.2.1).

  • The Facts: Mozilla’s DNS over HTTPs (DoH)

    The current insecure DNS system leaves billions of people around the world vulnerable because the data about where they go on the internet is unencrypted. We’ve set out to change that. In 2017, Mozilla began working on the DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) protocol to close this privacy gap within the web’s infrastructure. Today, Firefox is enabling encrypted DNS over HTTPS by default in the US giving our users more privacy protection wherever and whenever they’re online.

  • Goals for USA FREEDOM reauthorization: reforms, access, and transparency

    At Mozilla, we believe that privacy is a fundamental digital right. We’ve built these values into the Firefox browser itself, and we’ve pushed Congress to pass strong legal protections for consumer privacy in the US. This week, Congress will have another opportunity to consider meaningful reforms to protect user privacy when it debates the reauthorization of the USA FREEDOM Act. We believe that Congress should amend this surveillance law to remove ineffective programs, bolster resources for civil liberties advocates, and provide more transparency for the public. More specifically, Mozilla supports the following reforms... [...] Second, the program may not provide sufficiently valuable insights in the current threat environment. In a recent Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, the government acknowledged that the intelligence value of the program was outweighed by the costs and technical challenges associated with its continued operation. This conclusion was supported by an independent analysis from the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB), which hopes to publicly release an unclassified version of its report in the near future. Additionally, the shift to other forms of communications may make it even less likely that law enforcement will obtain useful information through this specific authority in the future. And finally, some technological shifts may have made the CDR program too complex to implement today. Citing to “technical irregularities” in some of the data obtained from telecom providers under the program, the NSA deleted three years’ worth of CDRs that it was not authorized to receive last June. While the agency has not released a specific explanation, Susan Landau and Asaf Lubin of Tufts University have posited that the problem stems from challenges associated with measures in place to facilitate interoperability between landlines and mobile phone networks.

  • Critiquing Design

    This is me about 25 years ago, dancing with a yoga ball. I was part of a theater company where I first learned Liz Lerman’s Critical Response Process. We used this extensively—it was an integral part of our company dynamic. We used it to develop company work, we used it in our education programs and we even used it to redesign our company structure. It was a formative part of my development as an artist, a teacher, and later, as a user-centered designer. What I love about this process is that works by embedding all the things we strive for in a critique into a deceptively simple, step-by-step process. You don’t have to try to remember everything the next time you’re knee-deep in a critique session. It’s knowledge in the world for critique sessions.

  • Firefox for Mac and Linux to get a new security sandbox system

Audiocasts/Shows: PinePhone, Linux Headlines, Ask Lunduke and More

  • PinePhone | Using Linux Phone instead of Android or Apple

    PinePhone | Using Linux Phone instead of Android or Apple I am going over the Pinephone, the next generation of open-source phones that have no spyware and tracking like the traditional iPhones and Android Phones of today. It is still in development, but I got my hands on one and I have to say I am impressed.

  • 2020-02-24 | Linux Headlines

    Richard Stallman has won the battle for the GNU project, another critical vulnerability in OpenSMTPD, and Arch Linux makes leadership changes.

  • Ask Lunduke - Feb 24, 2020 - Bloated Software and Licensing

    Ask Lunduke is a weekly podcast where the community can ask any question they like… and I (attempt to) answer them. This episode is available to all Patreon supporters. Topics on Ask Lunduke this week: If you had a magic button that would swap all Free Software for Proprietary… and all Proprietary for Free Software… would you? Why is modern software so bloated? Would you rather live in a home with no power, or a home where everything imaginable is an Internet of Things device, and you can't deactivate them or block their signal?

  • Mastering Cyber Security Basics: James Smith | Jupiter Extras 58

    Wes and Ell sit down with James Smith to have an honest conversation about what skills are needed to start a career and be successful in Tech and Information Security.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (libpam-radius-auth, pillow, ppp, proftpd-dfsg, and python-pysaml2), Fedora (firefox, glib2, hiredis, http-parser, libuv, mingw-openjpeg2, nghttp2, nodejs, openjpeg2, python-pillow, skopeo, and webkit2gtk3), Mageia (patch, postgresql, and systemd), Red Hat (ksh, nodejs:10, openjpeg2, python-pillow, systemd, and thunderbird), and SUSE (java-1_7_1-ibm, libsolv, libzypp, zypper, pdsh, slurm_18_08, and php53).

  • U.S. Government Says Update Chrome 80 As High-Rated Security Flaws Found

    Are you a Google Chrome user? High-rated security vulnerabilities have already been discovered in version 80 of Google Chrome. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency is encouraging Google users to update again just weeks after the Chrome 80 release. Here’s what you need to know.

  • OpenBSD Pwned, Patched Again: Bug is Remotely Exploitable [Ed: Misleading. This is about OpenSMTPD.]

    There’s a fresh remote code execution (RCE) vulnerability in OpenSMTPD, and by extension in OpenBSD. Yes, it feels like déjà vu all over again. The severity of the vulnerability, CVE-2020-8794, means that anyone running a public-facing OpenSMTPD deployments should update as soon as possible. OpenBSD’s developers describe the issue as a “an out of bounds read in smtpd [that] allows an attacker to inject arbitrary commands into the envelope file which are then executed as root. Separately, missing privilege revocation in smtpctl allows arbitrary commands to be run with the _smtpq group.”

  • Kali Linux explained: A pentester’s toolkit

    Kali Linux is the world's most popular offensive-security-optimized Linux distro. Maintained and managed by the fine folks at Offensive Security, Kali was born in 2006 as BackTrack Linux, but after a major refactoring in 2013 got the name Kali. What does the name mean? Well, we'll get to that.

  • Police to get right to use spyware in serious crime investigations

    The new bill, that will allow the police to use trojans or virus programmes to tap into the chats, is expected to be voted through parliament on Thursday. Home Affairs Minister Mikael Damberg says he is convinced it will lead to more convictions.

  • McAfee WebAdvisor: From XSS in a sandboxed browser extension to administrator privileges

    A while back I wrote about a bunch of vulnerabilities in McAfee WebAdvisor, a component of McAfee antivirus products which is also available as a stand-alone application. Part of the fix was adding a bunch of pages to the extension which were previously hosted on siteadvisor.com, generally a good move. However, when I looked closely I noticed a Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability in one of these pages (CVE-2019-3670). Now an XSS vulnerability in a browser extension is usually very hard to exploit thanks to security mechanisms like Content Security Policy and sandboxing. These mechanisms were intact for McAfee WebAdvisor and I didn’t manage to circumvent them. Yet I still ended up with a proof of concept that demonstrated how attackers could gain local administrator privileges through this vulnerability, something that came as a huge surprise to me as well.