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Secure, open source Linux handheld has an Ethernet port

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Linux
OSS

XXLSEC’s open-spec “ProteusDevice” handheld runs a security-hardened, Linux 5.4-based PriveOS without binary blobs on an i.MX6 with 1GB RAM, 8GB eMMC, 5-inch touchscreen, 10/100 Ethernet, and optional WiFi.

Helsinki, Finland-based XXLSEC has posted specs for a security focused, i.MX6 Quad based handheld called the ProteusDevice, which is based on its almost identical, but slightly smaller Privecall TX device. The minimalist Twitter and Reddit announcements claim the 5.5-inch touchscreen enabled device is for sale, but there’s no price or shopping page listed.

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ProteusDevice Secure, Open-Source Linux Handheld Features

  • ProteusDevice Secure, Open-Source Linux Handheld Features Ethernet Connectivity

    XXLSEC Ltd., the developer of the Privecall-TX device, has developed a near-identical, slightly bigger ProteusDevice, which runs the Linux 5.4 based PriveOS. The ProteusDevice handheld device (“not a mobile phone”) is said to have very tight security and was developed with secure access in mind.

    The market is seeing more Linux handheld and phones such as the Purism Librem 5, the PinePhone “Braveheart” both of which are already in mass production. There are also other computing options with the handheld Pocket Popcorn Computer, which is much like the PocketChip, but decidedly improved and faster in general, as well as the Solectrix SX Mobile Device Kit which is more of a business option, for smartphone, opensource development with no cellular connectivity, but Gigabit Ethernet and USB-to-UART ports.

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