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Mozilla and Curl Leftovers

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Software
Moz/FF
  • Ending QA community events, for now

    QMO events have been around for several years now, with many loyal Mozilla contributors engaged in various types of manual testing activities– some centered around verification of bug fixes, others on trying out exciting new features or significant changes made to the browser’s core ones. The feedback we received through them, during the Nightly and Beta phases, helped us ship polished products with each iteration, and it’s something that we’re very grateful for.

    We also feel that we could do more with the Testday and Bugday events. Their format has remained unchanged since we introduced them and the lack of a fresh new take on these events is now more noticeable than ever, as the overall interest in them has been dialing down for the past couple of years.

    We think it’s time to take a step back, review things and think about new ways to engage the community going forward.

  • Tips to improve your Ring camera security

    We cannot stress this enough. Weak and reused passwords are a serious vulnerability to your personal security and privacy. The software that the Nulled crew is using to tap into Ring feeds can be used to take over other things like, say, a Disney+ account. Or your bank account.

  • The Mozilla Blog: Petitioning for rehearing in Mozilla v. FCC

    Today, Mozilla continues the fight to preserve net neutrality protection as a fundamental digital right. Alongside other petitioners in our FCC challenge, Mozilla, Etsy, INCOMPAS, Vimeo and the Ad Hoc Telecom Users Committee filed a petition for rehearing and rehearing en banc in response to the D.C. Circuit decision upholding the FCC’s 2018 Order, which repealed safeguards for net neutrality.

    Our petition asks the original panel of judges or alternatively the full complement of D.C. Circuit judges to reconsider the decision both because it conflicts with D.C. Circuit or Supreme Court precedent and because it involves questions of exceptional importance.

  • Daniel Stenberg: Reporting documentation bugs in curl got easier

    After I watched a talk by Marcus Olsson about docs as code (at foss-sthlm on December 12 2019), I got inspired to provide links on the curl web site to make it easier for users to report bugs on documentation.

    Starting today, there are two new links on the top right side of all libcurl API function call documentation pages.

    File a bug about this page – takes the user directly to a new issue in the github issue tracker with the title filled in with the name of the function call, and the label preset to ‘documentation’. All there’s left is for the user to actually provide a description of the problem and pressing submit (and yeah, a github account is also required).

More in Tux Machines

New GNOME Mobile Shell Mockups Tease a Tactile Future on Tablets

With Phosh, the mobile face of GNOME Shell, taking shape on phones it’s not a major leap to start thinking about how the GNOME user experience might function on larger screen sizes. Like, say a tablet. Despite some folks thinking that GNOME Shell is a touch-focused UI, it isn’t. In fact, it’s pretty tedious to use without a keyboard or a mouse. Same was true of Unity, RIP. To succeed in a finger-driven environment you need a finger-driven interface. Just like the one on show in “very experimental” concept images recently shared by GNOME designer Tobias Bernard on the GNOME design Gitlab. Tobias is lead UI/UX designer at Purism and works directly on Phosh. Read more Also in GNOME today: Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Timelines on Calendar

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Linux Headlines, and Going Linux

  • LHS Episode #337: SDRAngel Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to Episode 337 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts take a deep dive into the shallow end of SDRAngel. The project is a GPLv3 licensed, modular front end and headless server for connecting to and operating SDR receivers and transceivers. Discussion includes where to find the software, how to build it, basic operation with broadcast FM stations, DMR, SSB, CW and more. Take a look. Try it out. Have fun with SDR. Hope you enjoy!

  • 2020-04-07 | Linux Headlines

    Microsoft proposes a new Linux kernel security mechanism, Firefox 75 rolls out significant changes, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation adopts Argo, and The Linux Foundation aims to boost adoption of the seL4 secure microkernel.

  • Going Linux #389 · Listener Feedback

    Bill burns out on distrohopping after providing multiple release reviews. Our listeners provide feedback on new user recommendations, hard drive mounting, encryption, trying Linux via USB, and the Linux Spotlight interview. We answer questions on security audit results. Episode 389 Time Stamps 00:00 Going Linux #389 · Listener Feedback 01:43 Bill burns out on distro hopping 02:24 but he has some feedback on a few releases 02:46 Linux Mint 19.3 03:24 Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 04:38 Endevour OS 07:13 ArcoLinux 10:19 Open Suse 12:16 Ubuntu MATE 14:49 Zorin 17:55 New user recommendations 24:22 Gregory: Hard drive mounting 27:28 Gregory: Great interview 30:09 John: Security audit recommendations 34:19 George: Paul's encryption problem 37:57 David: Linux via USB 44:09 goinglinux.com, goinglinux@gmail.com, +1-904-468-7889, @goinglinux, feedback, listen, subscribe 45:17 End

Linux powered automotive computer is loaded with wireless

Eurotech’s rugged “DynaGate 20-30” is an automotive-certified IoT edge gateway that runs Linux on an Apollo Lake SoC with LTE Cat 4, WiFi, BLE, GPS, 2x GbE, and isolated DIO, serial, and CAN. A week after announcing a BoltGate 20-31 transportation computer aimed at rolling stock applications, Eurotech has unveiled an “automotive-certified Multi-service IoT Edge Gateway.” The fanless DynaGate 20-30 runs the same Yocto-derived Eurotech Everyware Linux distribution with Eclipse tooling and Azul Java support on the same Intel Apollo Lake platform used by the BoltGate 20-31. Read more

Red Hat Promoting Linux Containers

  • Why Linux containers are a CIO's best friend

    CIOs have many challenges today (to say the least), but one of the biggest is enabling the constant development and delivery of new applications — no longer a "nice to have" but a "must have" in today's ever-changing business and global environments. There are many tools that can help CIOs provide this support, but one of the most important is Linux containers. In a recent Smarter with Gartner report, Gartner Distinguished VP Analyst Gene Alvarez named "enabling and balancing product and project management of applications to focus on delivering business outcomes while maintaining highly reliable core business operations" as being one of the key challenges CIOs face in 2020. Organizations are turning to containers as a way to provide this business-technology balance. Indeed, the use of Linux containers has increased significantly in just the last year.

  • Be careful when pulling images by short name
  • Migrating applications to OpenShift, Part 1: Overview