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FreeDOS 1.3 RC2

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We are moving toward the FreeDOS 1.3 release. FreeDOS 1.3 Release Candidate 2 is now available for download. Please help us test this new version!
A big feature in FreeDOS 1.3 will be booting into a LiveCD version of FreeDOS. You can test this by downloading FD13-LiveCD.zip, which contains FD13LIVE.ISO. This media is similar to the LegacyCD. However instead of relying on the BIOS floppy disk emulation, it uses SYSLINUX and MEMDISK to boot an emulated floppy disk. Along side support to perform a Plain and Full installation FreeDOS, this media is also able to run FreeDOS live from RAM or CD (depending on computer system and hardware) without installation to an internal hard disk drive. You can also download FreeDOS 1.3 RC2 in "Full" and "Lite" versions, and a "Legacy" CDROM version that is set up to let the CDROM boot on older hardware. Most users should try the LiveCD version.

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Also: FreeDOS 1.3 RC2 Released With "Live CD" Support

FreeDOS 1.3 RC2 now available with “Live CD” support

  • FreeDOS 1.3 RC2 now available with “Live CD” support

    Before we get to the release of FreeDOS 1.3, the brains behind the product have announced another release candidate that accompanies a new feature and various changes.

    In this article, we will discuss what the new release candidate of FreeDOS has in store for us. But first, let’s take a brief look at what the OS is actually about.

    As the name implies, FreeDOS is an operating system for anyone who wants a taste of the DOS environment and has an IBM-compatible computer. With this OS, you will not only be able to run legacy software but also support embedded systems. Other than that, FreeDOS is based on the monolithic kernel and offers a command-line interface.

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