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Linux 5.5-rc2

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Linux
  • Linux 5.5-rc2
    You all know the deal by now: another week, another rc.
    
    Things look normal - rc2 is usually fairly calm, and so it was this
    week too. All the stats look normal too - the bulk of this is drivers
    (gpu, rdma, networking, scsi, usb stand out, but there's noise
    elsewhere too), with the rest being random things all over - io_uring,
    filesystems (ceph, overlayfs), core networking, arch updates, header
    files, etc etc.
    
    So peeps - go build it, install it and boot it, and report back any
    problems you see,
    
    Linus

Linux 5.5-rc2 Kernel Released

  • Linux 5.5-rc2 Kernel Release

    On schedule with one week since the closure of the Linux 5.5 kernel merge window and subsequent release candidate, Linux 5.5-rc2 is out this evening for testing.

    Linux 5.5 is going to be a grand kernel release that will ultimately ship around the end of January. As covered in our Linux 5.5 feature overview there are many interesting changes in tow: support for the Raspberry Pi 4 / BCM2711, various performance changes still being explored, support for reporting NVMe drive temperatures, a new Logitech keyboard driver, AMD HDCP support for content protection, wake-on-voice support from Chromebooks, the introduction of KUnit for unit testing the kernel, new RAID1 modes that are quite exciting for Btrfs, and much more. (See that feature overview for the more thorough listing.)

LWN's Corbet

  • Kernel prepatch 5.5-rc2

    The second 5.5 kernel prepatch is out. "Things look normal - rc2 is usually fairly calm, and so it was this week too."

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