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Debian Votes to Stop SystemD 'Monopoly'

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Debian
  • Debian GR
    Starting results calculation at Sat Dec 28 00:00:29 2019
    
    Option 1 "F: Focus on systemd"
    Option 2 "B: Systemd but we support exploring alternatives"
    Option 3 "A: Support for multiple init systems is Important"
    Option 4 "D: Support non-systemd systems, without blocking progress"
    Option 5 "H: Support portability, without blocking progress"
    Option 6 "E: Support for multiple init systems is Required"
    Option 7 "G: Support portability and multiple implementations"
    Option 8 "Further Discussion"
    
    In the following table, tally[row x][col y] represents the votes that
    option x received over option y.
    
                      Option
                  1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8 
                ===   ===   ===   ===   ===   ===   ===   === 
    Option 1          185   246   223   227   278   243   307 
    Option 2    207         243   211   216   286   240   299 
    Option 3    159   131         113   120   250   165   225 
    Option 4    192   177   235         137   309   261   281 
    Option 5    187   168   222   163         301   246   271 
    Option 6    116   104    88    53    51         121   173 
    Option 7    168   145   176    93    91   207         216 
    Option 8    110   111   166   114   124   214   168       
    
    
    
    Looking at row 2, column 1, B: Systemd but we support exploring alternatives
    received 207 votes over F: Focus on systemd
    
    Looking at row 1, column 2, F: Focus on systemd
    received 185 votes over B: Systemd but we support exploring alternatives.
    
    Option 1 Reached quorum: 307 > 45.224440295044
    Option 2 Reached quorum: 299 > 45.224440295044
    Option 3 Reached quorum: 225 > 45.224440295044
    Option 4 Reached quorum: 281 > 45.224440295044
    Option 5 Reached quorum: 271 > 45.224440295044
    Option 6 Reached quorum: 173 > 45.224440295044
    Option 7 Reached quorum: 216 > 45.224440295044
    
    
    Option 1 passes Majority.               2.791 (307/110) >= 1
    Option 2 passes Majority.               2.694 (299/111) >= 1
    Option 3 passes Majority.               1.355 (225/166) >= 1
    Option 4 passes Majority.               2.465 (281/114) >= 1
    Option 5 passes Majority.               2.185 (271/124) >= 1
    Dropping Option 6 because of Majority. (0.8084112149532710280373831775700934579439)  0.808 (173/214) < 1
    Option 7 passes Majority.               1.286 (216/168) >= 1
    
    
      Option 2 defeats Option 1 by ( 207 -  185) =   22 votes.
      Option 1 defeats Option 3 by ( 246 -  159) =   87 votes.
      Option 1 defeats Option 4 by ( 223 -  192) =   31 votes.
      Option 1 defeats Option 5 by ( 227 -  187) =   40 votes.
      Option 1 defeats Option 7 by ( 243 -  168) =   75 votes.
      Option 1 defeats Option 8 by ( 307 -  110) =  197 votes.
      Option 2 defeats Option 3 by ( 243 -  131) =  112 votes.
      Option 2 defeats Option 4 by ( 211 -  177) =   34 votes.
      Option 2 defeats Option 5 by ( 216 -  168) =   48 votes.
      Option 2 defeats Option 7 by ( 240 -  145) =   95 votes.
      Option 2 defeats Option 8 by ( 299 -  111) =  188 votes.
      Option 4 defeats Option 3 by ( 235 -  113) =  122 votes.
      Option 5 defeats Option 3 by ( 222 -  120) =  102 votes.
      Option 7 defeats Option 3 by ( 176 -  165) =   11 votes.
      Option 3 defeats Option 8 by ( 225 -  166) =   59 votes.
      Option 5 defeats Option 4 by ( 163 -  137) =   26 votes.
      Option 4 defeats Option 7 by ( 261 -   93) =  168 votes.
      Option 4 defeats Option 8 by ( 281 -  114) =  167 votes.
      Option 5 defeats Option 7 by ( 246 -   91) =  155 votes.
      Option 5 defeats Option 8 by ( 271 -  124) =  147 votes.
      Option 7 defeats Option 8 by ( 216 -  168) =   48 votes.
    
    
    The Schwartz Set contains:
    	 Option 2 "B: Systemd but we support exploring alternatives"
    
    
    
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    
    The winners are:
    	 Option 2 "B: Systemd but we support exploring alternatives"
    
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    
    
  • Debian Developers Decide On Init System Diversity: "Proposal B" Wins

    The Debian developer voting over init system diversity options has wrapped up and a decision has been made.

    In recent months there has been lots of differing views over how much Debian should care about systemd alternatives some five years after they decided to move to systemd in the first place. Many in the Debian camp support Debian-without-systemd as an option but not all developers and those fixing bugs care about bugs that don't affect systemd, leading to this EOY2019 voting...

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  • Debian Project Votes 'Systemd But We Support Exploring Alternatives'

    The Debian Project has announced the results of its vote on how much to support non-systemd init systems. The eight options voted on included "Focus on systemd" and "Support for multiple init systems is required" (as well as milder choices like "Support for multiple init systems is Important" and "Support non-systemd systems, without blocking progress.") The winning option?

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