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Android Leftovers

More in Tux Machines

The Beat of a Different DRM – Purism

Canon made big news this past week when it started telling customers how to defeat the Digital Rights Management (DRM) in its toner cartridges because of supply chain issues with the chips they normally use to enforce it. That Canon explained how to bypass the DRM when it suited them, and that it didn’t negatively affect the operation of the printers or the customer, made it clear that DRM and the chips that enforce it offer little if any benefit to customers. Instead, DRM is only in place so the vendor can exert remote control over their product after the customer buys it. Computer vendors are marching to the beat of this DRM, and their ultimate goal is to exert the same sort of control printer and smartphone vendors enjoy into laptops and desktops. Read more Also: You Don't Own Your Movies, Music, Books, Games (DRM Is Evil!) - Invidious

Programming Leftovers

  • QuatBot released – Matrix Meeting Manager

    QuatBot is a Bot for use in text-chat. So there are no pretty screenshots of it in action, or what the UI looks like: pick your favorite Matrix client (I switch between nheko and neochat depending on which has a more recent release fixing bugs that annoy me).

  • AIfES releases exciting new version of TinyML library for Arduino

    Last July AIfES (Artificial Intelligence for Embedded Systems) from the Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems (IMS) was launched. This open source solution makes it possible to run, and even train, artificial neural networks (ANN) on almost any hardware, including the Arduino UNO. The team hasn’t stopped work on this exciting machine learning platform, and an update just landed that you’ll definitely want to check out.

  • Drew DeVault's blog: Status update, January 2022

    I also implemented an efficient path manipulation module for the standard library (something I would really have liked to have in C!), and progress continues on date/time support. We also have a new MIME module (just for Media Types, not all of MIME) and I expect a patch implementing net::uri to arrive in my inbox soon. I also finished up cmsg support (for sendmsg and recvmsg), which is necessary for the Wayland implementation I’m working on (and was a major pain in the ass). I spent some time working with another collaborator, who is developing a RISC-V kernel in our language, implementing a serial driver for the SiFive UART, plus improving the device tree loader and UEFI support.

  • Project audit experiences | Will's Blog

    Back in January 2020, I wrote How to pick up a project with an audit. I received some comments about it over the last couple of years, but I don't think I really did anything with them. Then Sumana sent an email asking whether I'd blogged about my experiences auditing projects and estimating how long it takes and things like that.

  • Hack The Web Without A Browser | Hackaday

    It is a classic problem. You want data for use in your program but it is on a webpage. Some websites have an API, of course, but usually, you are on your own. You can load the whole page via HTTP and parse it. Or you can use some tools to “scrape” the site. One interesting way to do this is woob — web outside of browsers.

  • The new Qt Quick Compiler technology

    It's been a while since we've heard about what goes on inside and around Qt QML, our engine to interpret the QML language (not counting the recent announcement, that is). The last post strictly about this topic was what Lars wrote in 2018. We've been so silent because we've been prototyping new ways to make your QML run faster, and some of them turned out to be dead ends. There is no tracing JIT after all. This isn't cool, so we were somewhat silent. But now there is something to say. And, mind you, it's not cool either. It's hot. But let me take a step back first.

  • Bash scripting(III)

    This is the third article of a series focused in Gnu Bash scripting. On the first article we’ve just created a simple script with commands, one after another. We also saw some variables use. The second article covered some bash control structures. This one will cover redirections, pipes, and command substitution.

  • TWC 147: Prime without Left, and Pent without Quad
  • 2022.03 RakuCon How? – Rakudo Weekly News

    Andrew Shitov is asking for the community’s opinion on whether or not to have an in-person Raku Conference in Riga in 2022 in The Raku Conference Update. Cancelling an in-person event now, means no financial risk, which seems safest.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack and WordPress

  • LHS Episode #448: Grounding and Bonding Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to the 448th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this deep dive episode, the hosts invite guest Ward Silver, N0AX, who literally wrote the book on the subject to discuss every aspect of grounding and bonding. Topics range from household electrical safety to relative voltage, earth grounding, lighting mitigation and much more. Hope you find this episode interesting and informative as well as entertaining and also have a great week.

  • WP Briefing: Episode 23: A letter from WordPress’ Executive Director

    As we greet a new year, WordPress’ Executive Director writes a letter to the project and community that speaks to the hopes of the year ahead.

Apache Weekly News Round-up: and Further Microsoft Declines in Web Servers

  • The Apache Weekly News Round-up: week ending 14 January 2022
  • January 2022 Web Server Survey [Ed: In Web servers, Microsoft down from 6.15% of top million domains to just 6.04% in one month]

    In the January 2022 survey we received responses from 1,167,715,133 sites across 269,835,071 unique domains and 11,700,892 web-facing computers. This reflects a loss of 1.15 million sites, but a gain of 1.51 million domains and 31,100 computers. nginx lost 7.33 million sites this month (-1.91%) but continues to be the most commonly used web server with 32.3% of all sites using it. Although nginx’s share has fallen, Apache is still more than eight percentage points behind after losing 3.70 million sites (-1.31%), which has taken its own market share down to 23.9%. nginx also leads in the domains metric, where it has a share of 26.6% compared with Apache’s 23.9%. This reflects a small reduction in nginx’s share – despite a modest gain of 25,400 domains – while Apache suffered the largest loss of 287,000 domains. The largest site and domain growth was seen by Pepyaka, which is a web server that has primarily been used by the Wix web development platform since it switched from using nginx in 2018. The number of sites using Pepyaka grew by 4.02 million to 7.30 million this month, while its domain count went up by 1.80 million to 3.30 million.