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FSF Raising Funds and Trisquel 9.0 Reaching Alpha

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GNU
  • Last chance to help us reach our membership goal in 2019!

    The pace and demands of modern life pressure us to carry computers in our pockets laden with nonfree software (our cell phones), and new threats to our privacy are popping up on every street corner, via proprietary Amazon Ring cameras, and on many kitchen counters, via “smart” home devices. Back when our movement was born, software freedom was only of great concern to people who were actively involved in development. Today, nobody in the world can afford to ignore the crucial importance of knowing what our software is doing, and keeping it from doing us harm.

    As the battles and triumphs of 2019 fade into the past and the new challenges of 2020 emerge, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) continues our commitment to the goal we’ve had from our earliest days: a future in which all software is free, and can be trusted to serve the needs and best interests of every user. Our strength depends on your support: we need you to boldly carry the message and goal of software freedom to everyone you know, bring them into the fold, and help us mobilize them to use and talk about free software.

    [...]

    We’re spending the end of this year making plans to make 2020 the best year for the FSF ever: you can read about some of these plans in the reports from our tech team, licensing and compliance team, and campaigns team. Will this be the year that we make user freedom a kitchen table issue? We’ll never stop trying – and we hope you’ll be by our side all the way.

  • Trisquel 9 Graphical ISO available for testing

    Note that the text installer is expected to be for the wrong Trisquel version at this time. Please only test the "Try Trisquel without installing" options and the graphical installer for now.

Coverage by Michael Larabel

  • FSF-Approved Trisquel 9.0 Reaches Development Milestone Before Ringing In The New Year

    Nearly two years after the release of Trisquel 8, the release of Trisquel 9 "Etiona" for this Free Software Foundation approved Linux distribution is quickly approaching. An alpha/development release of Trisquel 9 is available for testing.

    Trisquel 9 remains based upon Ubuntu 18.04 LTS while using the GNU Linux-libre kernel and other modifications to ensure the operating system is 100% free software to the ideals of the FSF. Of course, this means limited hardware support in some areas where binary microcode/firmware is otherwise required.

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