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Android Leftovers

Huawei Still Sold More Phones Than Apple In 2019

  • Huawei Still Sold More Phones Than Apple In 2019, But Admits 2020 Will Be ‘Difficult Year’

    Huawei’s smartphone business had a milestone year in 2018, as the company reached the 200 million phone shipment mark for the first time. It was also enough to push the Chinese tech giant ahead of Apple to become the world’s No. 2 smartphone brand by units sold. This year, despite being placed on the United States’ “entity list”—essentially an export blacklist—Huawei still managed to sell more phones than Apple, and likely remain in the number two spot.

    In an internal memo to employees that was shared with select media, Huawei’s rotating chairman Eric Xu announced today that the company sold 240 million phones in 2019. Apple, according to analysts, will finish the year at around 185 to 190 million phones sold. Samsung hasn’t announced figures yet, but it very likely remains at the top spot.

    Xu also announced in the memo that Huawei’s total revenue in 2019—which includes the company’s carrier business and enterprise business in addition to consumer gadgets—topped 850 billion yuan (around 121 billion), an 18% increase over 2018.

    These numbers are surprising, considering the Google export ban could have been a crippling blow to the company’s global phone business. But while Huawei declined to provide detailed breakdowns of its 2019 phone sales such as how many phones were sold outside of China, Xu does say in the memo that the company’s record phone sales are likely due to momentum carried over from early 2019 before essentially being banned from using Google, and even concedes that the company won’t grow in 2020 like it did in 2019.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • How to tell my mother that Free Software can cost money?

    For this episode we talk about why Free Software can cost money. Bonnie Mehring and Matthias Kirschner discuss the topics: How can I pay for Free Software and why is it important to pay and thereby support Free Software? What are the different models of earning money with Free Software and where is the difference of earning money as an individual or as a company. Throughout this conversation both explain the concept of Free Software and talk about some of the most common questions. This is the perfect episode for explaining to your loved ones what Free Software is.

  • The International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is today -- here's what you can do to help | Defective by Design

    There's no time like the present to stand up against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). Fittingly, today is the Defective by Design campaign's annual International Day Against DRM (IDAD)! As months of quarantine have only tightened the stranglehold DRM has on how so many people experience culture, we have a lot of work ahead of us. If each person reading this takes a small step to show their support for the movement, we can have a meaningful and lasting effect.

  • Are Bill Gates’s Billions Distorting Public Health Data?

    “It seems to be a version of the playbook Trump follows,” says Sam Clark, a demographer at Ohio State University. “Absolutely nothing negative sticks, and the more exposure you get, the better, no matter what. It’s really stunning, and I don’t know any other scientific personality or organization that is able to pull it off quite like IHME.”

  • Nicholas Nethercote: Farewell, Mozilla

    Today is my last day working for Mozilla. I will soon be starting a new job with Apple. [...] I have a lot of memories, and the ones relating to these two projects are at the forefront. Thank you to everyone I’ve worked with. It’s been a good time. As I understand it, this blog will stay up in read-only mode indefinitely. I will make a copy of all the posts and if it ever goes down I will rehost them at my personal site.

  • Google Opens Up "Atheris" To Automatically Find Bugs In Python Code - Phoronix

    Google today is announcing the open-sourcing of Atheris, a Python fuzzer they developed internally for automatically finding bugs within Python code and native extensions.

  • Dbus-Broker 25 Released With More Fixes

    The BUS1 kernel code for providing an in-kernel, capability-based IPC mechanism hasn't seen much (or any?) activity in well over a year but at least the Dbus-Broker project continues ahead. Dbus-Broker continues ahead as this D-Bus compatible implementation focused on correctness while being optimized for performance.

  • [Older] VTOWN Goes to Current

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  • Thanksgiving Updates

    It's Thanksgiving day in the US and Patrick gives a very nice gift to every Slackware users which he posted on his Patreon page. He pushed GNOME-related stacks to main tree (including UPower 0.99.x) and XFCE stack to vtown. Please note that this update will affect those who are using MSB and CSB projects as some of the dependencies are now part of the main tree, so before upgrading, it would be good idea to remove them first.

Proprietary Software, Openwashing, Surveillance

  • Setting a standard for digital public goods | Opensource.com

    In June 2020, the Secretary-General of the United Nations published a "Roadmap for Digital Cooperation." In this report, he expanded on recommendations made a year before, calling on all actors, including the Member States, the United Nations system, the private sector, and others, to promote digital public goods. He says to realize the benefits of increased internet connectivity, open source projects in the form of digital public goods must be at the center.

  • Vivaldi adds privacy features in new version for Android

    Norway-based Vivaldi Technologies has released a new version of its browser for the Android mobile operating system, which it says has added WebRTC leak protection and auto-clearing of browsing data upon exit.

  • Control your holiday lights with a tap of a Disney MagicBand

    Because of travel limitations due to the pandemic, Civitano decided to create a replica of a MagicBand reader that uses an NFC card reader module to recognize a programmed MagicBand, which triggers a ring of LEDs, audio output, and a relay for Christmas lighting. This setup could likely be applied to other devices, opening up its possibilities into January and beyond. Electronics for the build — including an Arduino Mega that runs the show — are hidden inside of a 3D-printed, property-themed enclosure that resembles those found outside of any Disney theme park. This would potentially preserve a sense of wonder at the device, and diffuses the LEDs nicely.

  • Avoid “Advertiser ID” with the Librem 5

    Apple and Google profess to care about the privacy rights of their customers, but their operating systems tell a different story. iOS and Android both allow for pervasive tracking of users through Advertiser IDs. Google uses a version is known as GAID (Google Advertiser Identification) and Apple uses its version called IDFA (Identifier For Advertisers). While most advertisers claim it’s a benefit because you got a coupon for your pizza, it instead keeps a permanent record of everything your phone has done. That treasure trove of your personal information is shared with any party participating in the user tracking business model, which ends up meaning most apps on your phone.

today's howtos

  • Font Management On Linux - YouTube

    Many new-to-Linux users have questions about installing fonts and previewing fonts on Linux. While there are some nice GUI applications that help with these tasks, you don't actually need to install any extra programs to manage your fonts.

  • Dmenu Is Great So I'll Keep Simping For It - YouTube

    At this point the only Suckless tool I actively use is Dmenu, it's an absolute great launcher especially if you're the kind of person who doesn't really care about having a super fancy looking app, Dmenu is functional and that's all it needs to be.

  • Remove ^M (CTRL-M) Characters from a File in Linux - Putorius

    Operating systems have different ways to handle a newline in their text editors. For example Windows uses a specific carriage return (CR) which is depicted as ^M on Linux, followed by a line feed (LF) to indicate a newline. Linux and UNIX on the other hand use only the line feed to denote the end of a line. This often causes issues when transferring (or even copy and pasting) a file from Windows to Linux. It is hard to spot, and often leaves people scratching their head and wondering why their configuration file is not working.

  • How to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Install Rocket.Chat on CentOS 8

    Rocket.Chat is a free and open-source chat and messaging application built with Meteor. It is an alternative to Slack and allows you to chat with other members, make video and audio calls, create channels and private groups, share files, and folders and many more. It is self-hosted and helps your team to communicate and share ideas on desktop and mobile devices.

  • How to Check Ubuntu Version with Command or Script

    The lsb-release is the standard package for reporting the version on Ubuntu systems. Which is basically written in Python programming language. The lsb-release package provides a command lsb_release used to check Ubuntu version and codename on command line. In this tutorial, you will learn various options to lsb_release command on Ubuntu system.

  • Updated Docker pages