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WINE Gaming: Steam, Half-Life, Half-Life 2, Counter Strike Source And 1.6

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Gaming
HowTos

Half Life 2 and Counter Strike are two of the most popular First Person Shooters available. These games are available for Windows PCs in first place. A growing number of people uses Linux as their major operating system and does not want to renounce their favored games.

This HOWTO should make it possibly for anybody to get Steam working with Wine.

2.1. Downloading Wine Binaries

Download the latest Wine from
http://www.winehq.org/site/download
(http://www.winehq.org/site/download-deb for Ubuntu/Debian)

or use your distribution-specific packaging tool to install Wine. For example, Debian and Ubuntu users may just use apt-get install wine after adding Wine repositories (s. above)

Wine versions 0.9.7 to 0.9.10 have an OpenGL regression which may cause bad performance in Half-Life 1 based games. Use the newest version instead (0.9.11 or newer).

Now run wine without any parameters. When wine is run for the first time, it creates all necessary directories, including your fake C: drive, which is per default located in ~/.wine/drive_c.

2.2. Compiling Wine From CVS

Full Story.

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