Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

You Want A WAR? I'll Give You A War!

Filed under

Choose any metaphor you like. The gauntlet has been thrown down, I’m-a callin’ you out, I’ve only begun to fight…it doesn’t really matter which you choose. The war has begun…long ago actually, and there are even arguements as to who started it. Regardless of who or when, the war “is”. It is the war of bits and bytes, of file systems and desktops.

It is a war between Linux and Microsoft. Soldiers on each side have locked and loaded.

I have lamented often about the plight of Linux. Some claim that I am overly harsh and critical about the Linux operating system and some of the people involved with it. I am…and for my own good reasons. Many people see no “war”, they see no conflict or damage being done by either side. To those who believe this way, it is you who have the most to lose and if Microsoft wins; you lose something more valuable than gold.

Your freedom to choose.

Microsoft has amassed a fortune and not in just financial assets. Their fortune lies in the minds of people who think that Microsoft products are the only real choice they have…and Microsoft markets to these people extensively. You need to look to Europe where the bloodiest battle of the war is currently being fought. Linux and Open Source have engaged the enemy there on the battlefield of patents and monopolies. Many feel the battle there is already lost, but I disagree. People in Europe tend to pay a bit more attention than we Americans do, and that is to their advantage. Had the Europeans not been paying attention, figuratively, they would have been shot in the back.

The war is being fought over what people believe…what they know and use. I challenge you to answer me because many of you have been either kept ignorant or just outright lied to. This is what I want to know:

*Why do you insist on reformating your hard drive after a virus destroys your data and replace your system with software that allowed the damage to occur in the first place?

*Why do you use a product from a company that demands your ignorance and counts upon it to succeed?

*Why do you allow a company to dictate to you when and how you are to use the software YOU paid for?

*Why do you pay hundreds or thousands of dollars for software when there is a better alternative and it is free?

I can only guess as to what the answers to these questions might be. If it is due to the fact that you simply do not know your options, then I am doing my best to make you aware of them. Many of you are just plain lazy and do not want to learn anything new. Why should you? If things are perfect inside that little beige box under your desk, then maybe you are justified in your apathy. For now. The acid test of your judgement skills will come when things go terribly wrong…and if you use Microsoft Windows, eventually they will. Take a minute and look at


In a nutshell, you will read that over 900 million viri, trojans and malware tools are spread via email on any given day. that number is projected to climb to 4200 million a day by 2009. The main target for these weapons are Windows computers. The second link is going to tell you that as a Windows home user, your defenses are almost cut in half by the new and varying attacks.

And you just keep clicking without a care in the world.

Microsoft is the little Dutch boy with his finger in the dike. the onslaught is continuous and unforgiving and eventually, they are going to lose the fight. Don’t you dare spend a second contemplating pity for them. They knew what they were doing when they coded their operating system. They simply under estimated the number of jerks and script kiddies in the world. Within 72 hours of Microsoft making available their anti-spyware tool, three exploits were published to the web to get by it. In fact, one of them actually used the code within the tool to do its dirty work. Those tiny cracks are starting to gush water.

While all of this has been going on, the developers of the Linux Kernel have been quietly and effectively strengthening and hardening the Linux Operating System. Many argue that once Linux achieves a higher status and user base, then attacks against it are inevitable.

Bring it on.

See, Linux has no registry. The file system in Linux is a fortress by design and it will take much more effort than downloading a script from a rogue page and infecting someone via email. Much more, so much more in fact that most people will just give up. Don’t underestimate the maliciousness of some people…they will try no doubt. They will not find the fertile ground that is found in Windows.

I sat on my deck this morning at 5 AM, wanting to greet my day as it arrived. Somewhere between my first cup of coffee and my second cigarette, a powerful yet calming thought came to mind. I have been wrong about something important. I have complained loudly that Linux is too fragmented by both the number of distributions and the geographical disparity of its developers. What I saw as a weakness is indeed Linux’s main strength. There is no one focal point to attack…no corporation to bring down or group of stockholders or hardware manufacturers to blackmail. Gates and Ballmer must be swilling Malox by the gallon and just for the reasons I outlined above. Linus Torvalds, Richard Stallman and Eric Raymond…please accept my apology. I was wrong. It is you who are truly the genius.

And brave soldiers as well.

All-righty then


More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.

OSS in the Back End

  • AtScale Delivers Findings on BI-Plus-Hadoop
    Business intelligence is the dominant use-case for IT organizations implementing Hadoop, according to a report from the folks at AtScale. The benchmark study also shows which tools in the Haddop ecosystem are best for particular types of BI queries. As we've reported before, tools that demystify and function as useful front-ends and connectors for the open source Hadoop project are much in demand. AtScale, billed as “the first company to allow business users to do business intelligence on Hadoop,” focused its study on the strengths and weaknesses of the industry’s most popular analytical engines for Hadoop – Impala, SparkSQL, Hive and Presto.
  • Study Says OpenStack at Scale Can Produce Surprising Savings
    Revenues from OpenStack-based businesses are poised to grow by 35 percent a year to more than $5 billion by 2020, according to analysts at 451 Research. In its latest Cloud Price Index, 451 Research analyzes the costs associated with using various cloud options to determine when it becomes better value to use a self-managed private cloud instead of public or managed cloud services. The idea is to createa complex pricing model that takes into consideration the major factors impacting total cost of ownership (TCO), including salaries and workload requirements.The 451 study found that because of the prevalence of suitably qualified administrators, commercial private cloud offerings such as VMware and Microsoft currently offer a lower TCO when labor efficiency is below 400 virtual machines managed per engineer. But where labor efficiency is greater than this, OpenStack becomes more financially attractive. In fact, past this tipping point, all private cloud options are cheaper than both public cloud and managed private cloud options.
  • How OpenStack mentoring breaks down cultural barriers
    Victoria Martinez de la Cruz is no stranger to OpenStack's mentorship opportunities. It's how she got her own start in OpenStack, and now a few years later is helping to coordinate many of these opportunities herself. She is speaking on a panel on mentoring and internships later this week at OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Spain. In this interview, we catch up with Victoria to learn more about the details of what it's like to be a part of an open source internship, as well as some helpful advice for people on both sides of the mentoring process.