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Richard Stallman on "World Domination 201"

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OSS

The "World Domination 201" made an impact on some parts of the Free Software community, including myself as I found myself in agreement. However, as I believe in Free Software and hence tend to prioritize the issue of freedom I was interesting in hearing what Richard Stallman, the head of the FSF, has to say about it. So I fired up the following email.

What if FSF, or maybe some other entity representing the Free Software community would sign a contract with a certain GNU/Linux distro provider which would let that distro provider temporarily include non-free software, but only if they work on replacing this non-free software with Free Software and do it within a time of two years (for example). And if they fail to do this in two years the contract would require them to remove non-free software anyway and replace it with whatever they can come up with in the meantime.

If some distro maker wants to do this, he can make a public commitment
such that failure to follow through would be embarrassing. Making it
a contract with the FSF would not really help. We would be in a
contradictory position if we endorsed the initial inclusion of the
non-free software.

Full Story.


Also:

Richard Stallman, the guru of free software, has taken a deliberate stance to favour and support in all ways possible the use of free software also when it comes to publishing his video interviews.

In other words, Stallman wants YouTube or other video sharing sites not to publish video clips of his interviews or lectures as these video distribution services do not utilize video software and file formats that adhere to the Free Software Foundation principles.

No More Stallman On YouTube? Open-Source Evangelist Says No To The Use Of Proprietary Video Formats

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