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Games: Pokémon Go, Playscii, Trains & Things and More

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Gaming
  • Pokémon Go never went away — 2019 was its most lucrative year ever

    According to mobile analytics firm Sensor Tower, Pokémon Go had a record year in 2019, taking in an estimated $900 million through in-app purchases. That means Pokémon Go has surpassed its launch year in revenue after seeing a drop off in both players and spending back in 2017. It’s a rare comeback feat for a free-to-play game, many of which are flash-in-the-pan successes and fade into obscurity.

  • If you want to make some ASCII art, animations and games check out Playscii

    Playscii from developer JP LeBreton seems like a sweet open source application, giving you some handy tools for making ASCII art and it also acts as a game engine too.

    Cross-platform so it supports Linux, macOS and Windows along with the code available under the MIT license there's not really any restrictions on what you do with it. Being able to convert existing images is probably my favourite feature though, it's a lot of fun to play with. Not just for game developers who need some ASCII art, but it's simple enough for anyone to use. Converting game screenshots to make awesome backgrounds, logos and whatever else.

  • Multiplayer economic strategy game 'Trains & Things' releasing this month

    Currently in development by bitshift in Godot Engine, Trains & Things is a multiplayer economic real-time strategy game. The developer has now announced it's going to enter Early Access on January 24.

    Trains & Things has you run a logistics company by your self or with friends. A game of supply, demand and risk as you try to keep the money coming in as you expand across the map. The focus is on the online (or LAN) play, with cross-platform multiplayer between Linux and Windows.

  • Upcoming eco tycoon sim 'Among Ripples: Shallow Waters' has a demo out

    Help maintain a delicate ecosystem in Among Ripples: Shallow Waters, an in-development eco tycoon sim with a focus on lakes and rivers. Originally announced as Among Ripples 2, they changed the title back in November.

    Recently, Eat Create Sleep put up a demo (with a Linux build) as they're preparing to launch a Kickstarter campaign at some point early this year. The prototype demo gives a small but interesting slice into what to expect and it's actually pretty relaxing, quite impressive considering they say it's just a "proof of concept". Reminds me of the atmosphere in Megaquarium with it being very peaceful.

  • Upcoming supernatural horror adventure 'ASYLUM' development sounds good

    While it doesn't yet have a release date, it does sound like development on the upcoming supernatural horror adventure 'ASYLUM' is going well.

    After announcing last month that the team at Senscape were awarded an Epic MegaGrant, the founder Agustín Cordes said on Twitter that ASYLUM now has "[…] an internal demo with releasable quality and solid performance on Windows 32/64, Mac and Linux. All the platforms that we promised!". That's good news for Linux gamers, as it sounds like it's going to be in a good state when it's released.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Lite 5.2 Is Now Ready for Testing Based on Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS

While you’re probably enjoying your Linux Lite 5.0 installation, work has begun on the next major release, Linux Lite 5.2, which will be based on Canonical’s Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system and the long-term supported Linux 5.4 kernel series. As usual, there are also various improvements and new features. For example, Linux Lite 5.2 will now let users manage the Firewall and Lite Widget settings from the Settings Manager, show laptop battery status in the Lite Widget, as well as to restore the Taskbar and system tray icons to default from the Lite Tweaks utility. Read more

Microsoft is Bringing Edge Browser to Linux in October

At the Ignite 2020, Microsoft announced that the Chromium-based Edge browser will have a Linux preview build in October this year. Read more

Security: Site SSL, Cynet an Ksplice-based Patching

  • Why You Should Use SSL on Your Website

    With the evolution of the internet, security threats have also risen to a great extent. [...] SSL is the digital certificate known as the “Secure Socket Layer” that provides the foundation for stronger security on a website. It acts as a shield and safeguard when sensitive information travels from one place to another between computers/servers. SSL can be defined as trustworthy files that cryptographically form an encrypted link between a browser and a web server. Any information that is sent or received on a page that is not secure can be hacked and intercepted by cyber-criminals and hackers. Important information, such as bank transaction details and personal details become accessible to hackers. A website that is encrypted with SSL binds a secure connection between the web browser and servers to ensure that no third party has access to your information.

  • Cynet Report Details Increase in Cyber Attacks During Pandemic

    Cynet has released a report detailing changes in cyberattacks observed across North America and Europe since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Cynet compared the number of cyberattacks during the COVID-19 outbreak to the previous three months for several industry sectors and saw increases of more than 20 percent in the areas of finance (up 32%), food production (29%), and retail (23%).

  • Security Patching Made Simple for Linux HPC Instances in Oracle Cloud [Ed: Oracle pushing Ksplice as its Linux selling point]

    The explosion of data in today's computing landscape has fueled the need for even greater security to protect the applications and workloads, and is crucial to an organization's success and competitive advantage. This is equally true when running compute intensive high performance computing (HPC) applications that consume large amounts of data, which are critical to an organization’s business or research endeavors. Oracle Cloud Infrastructure provides a platform that can help keep HPC systems secure and improve the speed and stability of applications. Security patch management is a challenge given the sheer number of instances in HPC clustered environments. Often, HPC environments are left unpatched for long periods of time, leaving systems exposed due to delays caused by complex, time-consuming, and labor-intensive patch management processes. We'll describe three ways in which this is addressed with Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. [...] Ksplice, Autonomous Linux, and the OS Management service are provided for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure customers at no additional cost. Oracle Linux HPC customers on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure enjoy additional benefits including free Oracle Linux Premier Support and price per performance advantages. Additionally, Oracle Linux is 100% application binary compatible with RHEL. This means that RHEL customers on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure can eliminate support fees by easily switching to Oracle Linux. HPC customers who leverage these advanced Linux patching technologies in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure benefit from improved system security, reduced downtime, simplified operations, and cost savings. To learn more about Oracle Cloud patch management options, sign up for an Oracle Cloud Infrastructure account today and take advantage of free cloud credits.

Automation controller builds on Raspberry Pi CM3+

Sfera Labs’ “Iono Pi Max” industrial controller runs Linux on a RPi Compute Module 3+ and offers 10/100 LAN, 3x USB, isolated CAN and serial, relay and analog I/Os, plus RTC, UPS, and more. Sfera Labs has launched an Iono Pi Max edge computing and industrial controller that “combines the high-reliability and bus interfaces of the Strato Pi product line with the I/O capabilities of Iono Pi.” We covered both the Strato Pi CAN and Iono Pi add-on boards for the Raspberry Pi in our 2017 Strato Pi CAN report.Automation controller builds on Raspberry Pi CM3+ Read more