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Programming: Bash and Python

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Development
  • Introduction to Bash Scripting Tutorial

    Linux Shell Scripting is & always has been one of the most desired skills that a System Administrator and now DevOps engineers are required to have. It has been used by Linux experts to perform all sorts of tasks, especially repetitive tasks or for automating tasks.

    Consider this post as the central reference point for all Scripting tutorials published here at The Linux GURUS. This scripting tutorial just provides a brief about scripting & why we require it. Mentioned below is the list of all tutorials to get yourself started with & master it.

  • Bash scripting – Understanding Linux Environment variablesBash scripting – Understanding Linux Environment variables
  • Bash Scripting-2- Using VARIABLES in Linux shell scripts
  • Bash scripting – 3 – Performing Arithmetic Operation in shell script
  • Python for Beginners: Making Your First Socket Program (Client & Server Communication)

    Sockets in Python have always been something I see online and thing "Why is this complex"? "Shouldn't there be a simple way to get started with sockets"? So I decided to make a tutorial myself: However, just like everything in coding, there can be varying levels of compelxity and different implementations for the same tech. Today we are going to look at one simple example for beginners that can help you dive into the vast world of sockets and Python as a whole.

  • Small python application which will remove duplicate files from the windows 10 os [Ed: Windows sadly]

    I am glad to inform you all that the remove duplicate file project written with python has finally completed and now it will be uploaded to GitHub for your all to enjoy. This is free software and it will always remain free. Although I would really love to create a Linux version of this remove duplicate file’s software, but I do not have a Linux os’s computer therefore at the moment this software is just for the windows user only. I have packed this software up where you can just download the setup.exe file and then install the program and start it up to search and destroy the duplicate files inside your computer. Here are the steps you need to do to search and destroy the duplicate files:

  • PyDev of the Week: Tyler Reddy

    This week we welcome Tyler Reddy (@Tyler_Reddy) as our PyDev of the Week! Tyler is a core developer of Scipy and Numpy. He has also worked on the MDAnalysis library, which is for particle physics simulation analysis.

    [...]

    I grew up in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada and stayed there until my late twenties. My Bachelor and PhD degrees were both in biochemistry, focused on structural biology. I did travel a lot for chess, winning a few notable tournaments in my early teen years and achieving a master rating in Canada by my late teens. Dartmouth is also known as the “City of Lakes,” and I grew up paddling on the nearby Lake Banook. In the cold Canadian Winter the lake would freeze over and training would switch to a routine including distance running—this is where my biggest “hobby” really took off. I still run about 11 miles daily in the early morning.

    I did an almost six year post-doc in Oxford, United Kingdom. I had started to realize during my PhD that my skill set was better suited to computational work than work on the lab bench. Formally, I was still a biol- ogist while at Oxford, but it was becoming clear that my contributions were starting to look a lot more like applied computer science and computational geometry in particular. I was recruited to Los Alamos National Labora- tory to work on viruses (the kind that make a person, not computer, sick), but ultimately my job has evolved into applied computer scientist here, and nothing beats distance running in beautiful Santa Fe, NM.

  • Started work on getting py-spy/speedscope in RunSnakeRun

    So having finally written down the thoughts on a carbon tax, that kept distracting me from actually working on Open Source, I finally got a bit of work done on Open Source on the last night of the vacation.
    What I started work on was getting a sampling profiler format supported, and for that I chose py-spy, particularly its speedscope export format. The work is still early days, but it does seem to work in my initial test cases.

  • 5 Best Text Editors for Programmers [Ed: Too much Microsoft promotion here; some Windows-only editors and 40% of them Microsoft-controlled. This is ridiculous.]

    Need a Text editor for programming? These 5 will have you covered. They are the best text editors in 2019. Programming can be a breeze with a high quality text editor, with syntax highlighting, code completion and other modern technological features to improve your coding standards. Let’s check out the best text editor for programmers.

  • Top 3 Best Python Books You Should Read in 2019

    We have reviewed the top 3 best Python programming books in 2019. Python is one of the most commonly used programming languages in today’s developing world. These books provide quality content for you to upgrade your python skills to the next level. These books are great for anyone with an interest in Python programming.

    [...]

    Python is one the best programming languages for a myriad of industries. It’s considered a very powerful language, providing the power to build applications quickly. Take your Python knowledge to the next level with these books.

More in Tux Machines

Meet the New Linux Distro Inspired by the iPad

I’ve seen a tonne of Linux distros come and go in the 12 years I’ve been blogging about Ubuntu, but precious few have been designed exclusively for tablet use. So when I came across JingOS, a new Ubuntu-based distro touting a touch-centric UI, I was naturally intrigued. Tablet-based Linux distros aren’t exactly common. JingOS’s developers say it is “the world’s first iPadOS-style Linux distro”. I don’t imagine anyone is going to take issue with that statement, especially once they’ve seen how it looks! Read more

Linus Torvalds Decides To Land NVIDIA RTX 30 "Ampere" Support In Linux 5.11

While new feature code is normally not allowed in past the end of the merge window for a given Linux kernel release cycle, Linus Torvalds has decided to merge the newly-published open-source driver code for the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30 "Ampere" graphics cards for the Linux 5.11 kernel that will debut as stable in February. Ahead of this weekend's Linux 5.11-rc4 release, Linus Torvalds has merged the new initial open-source code for the NVIDIA RTX 30 / Ampere GPUs via the Nouveau driver. He was fine with allowing this late addition to Linux 5.11 as the new hardware support is all self-contained and doesn't risk regressing the existing NVIDIA GPU support within the Nouveau driver. Thus it's one of the rare times he permits new code to be added after a merge window since there is minimal risk of it regressing the status quo of hardware support. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Minimalist vs Modern - Linux Mint 20.1

    It's time to check out the two desktop environments built for the latest release of Linux Mint 20.1 - MATE and Cinnamon!

  • Google Docs Replacement | Self-Hosted 36

    Our favorite Google Docs killer with markdown support has a big update. We explain how we host it and why we love it.

  • Announcing Istio 1.8.2

    This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.8.1 and Istio 1.8.2

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2021/02 – Dominique a.k.a. DimStar (Dim*)

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers, Somewhere, I read, 2021 will be the year of the Linux desktop. Do you agree? Let’s make it the year of Tumbleweed on the desktop. In any case, Tumbleweed has been steadily rolling with 5 snapshots published during this week (0107, 0108, 0110, 0111, and 0113).

  • Ubuntu 21.04 To Expand The Use Of Phased Package Updates - Phoronix

    With this spring's release of Ubuntu 21.04 there is more widespread use of "phased updates" for gradually rolling out new stable release updates to help avoid any regressions en masse from coming to light. For years the Ubuntu desktop has employed this phased updates strategy while now with it being plumbed into APT, Ubuntu Server and other versions will by default make use of phased updates. Going back a number of years in Ubuntu has been Phased Updates that wired into Update Manager has led to the gradual rollout of new stable release updates over a period of about two days. This has been done gradually to ensure that no regressions or potential big problems hit all Ubuntu users at once by over the course of many hours exposing more Ubuntu users to these updates.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (flatpak, ruby-redcarpet, and wavpack), Fedora (dia, mingw-openjpeg2, and openjpeg2), Mageia (awstats, bison, cairo, kernel, kernel-linus, krb5, nvidia-current, nvidia390, php, and thunderbird), openSUSE (cobbler, firefox, kernel, libzypp, zypper, nodejs10, nodejs12, and nodejs14), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), Slackware (wavpack), SUSE (kernel, nodejs8, open-iscsi, openldap2, php7, php72, php74, slurm_20_02, and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (ampache and linux, linux-hwe, linux-hwe-5.4, linux-hwe-5.8, linux-lts-xenial).

  • Project Zero: Introducing the In-the-Wild Series

    At Project Zero we often refer to our goal simply as “make 0-day hard”. Members of the team approach this challenge mainly through the lens of offensive security research. And while we experiment a lot with new targets and methodologies in order to remain at the forefront of the field, it is important that the team doesn’t stray too far from the current state of the art. One of our efforts in this regard is the tracking of publicly known cases of zero-day vulnerabilities. We use this information to guide the research. Unfortunately, public 0-day reports rarely include captured exploits, which could provide invaluable insight into exploitation techniques and design decisions made by real-world attackers. In addition, we believe there to be a gap in the security community’s ability to detect 0-day exploits.

  • Google series on in-the-wild exploits

    The Google Project Zero blog is carrying a six-part series exploring, in great detail, a set of sophisticated exploits discovered in the wild.