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3 Music Media Players for the Debian 10 Terminal

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Software

If you are addicted to the Terminal and always find the ways to do every possible thing inside the Terminal, then why not listening to music through it. The command line or Terminal gives you everything you need in a more efficient and faster way while also utilizing fewer resources. It also becomes handier when you are using a headless version of your operating system.

In this article, we are going to look at some tools using which you can listen to your favorite music right from your command line. This may be useful in scenarios such as the one I described above. Moreover, we will explain how to install and use these tools and also to remove them if needed.

We have run the commands and procedures mentioned in this article on a Debian 10 OS.

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