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Release for CentOS Linux 8 (1911)

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Red Hat

Release for CentOS Linux 8 (1911)

We are pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 8.
Effectively immediately, this is the current release for CentOS Linux 8 and is tagged as 1911,
derived
from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Source Code.

As always, read through the Release Notes at :
http://wiki.centos.org/Manuals/ReleaseNotes/CentOS8.1911 - these notes
contain important information about the release and details about some
of the content inside the release from the CentOS QA team. These notes
are updated constantly to include issues and incorporate feedback from
the users.

Read more

CentOS Linux 8.1 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat

  • CentOS Linux 8.1 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1

    CentOS Linux 8.1 (1911) is here almost four months after the introduction of the CentOS Linux 8 operating system series, which is based on Red Hat's Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 operating system series, to add all the new features and improvements implemented upstream in the latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 release.

    Highlights include kernel live patching, a new routing protocol stack called FRR which supports multiple IPv4 and IPv6 routing protocols, an extended version of the Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF) to help sysadmins troubleshoot complex network issues, support for re-encrypting block devices in LUKS2 while the devices are in use, as well as a new tool for generating SELinux policies for containers called udica.

CentOS-8 1911 Released As Rebuild Off Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8

  • CentOS-8 1911 Released As Rebuild Off Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1

    CentOS 8 1911 has been released today as the community rebuild rebased to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 that debuted back in November.

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 brought official support for kernel live-patching, various container focused updates, new Enterprise Linux System Roles, hybrid cloud improvements, and other security improvements and package updates.

    More details on CentOS 8 1911 can be found via the release notes but as is standard it basically comes down to being a community rebuild of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1.

CentOS Linux 8.1 (1911) released and here is how to upgrade it

  • CentOS Linux 8.1 (1911) released and here is how to upgrade it

    CentOS Linux 8.1 (1191) released. It is a Linux distribution derived from RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) 8.1 source code. CentOS was created when Red Hat stopped providing RHEL free. CentOS 8.1 gives complete control of its open-source software packages and is fully customized for research needs or for running a high-performance website without the need for license fees. Let us see what’s new in CentOS 8.1 (1911) and how to upgrade existing CentOS 8.0.1905 server to 8.1.1911 using the command line.

CentOS Linux 8 (1911) Released: Free/Community Version Of RHEL 8

  • CentOS Linux 8 (1911) Released: Free/Community Version Of RHEL 8.1

    Just four months after the release of first CentOS 8 series based on the Red Hed Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 source code, the second CentOS Linux 8 (1911) was released on Jan 15, 2020.

    If you’re aware, CentOS is the “community version” of RHEL. The current release for CentOS 8, tagged as 1911, is derived from RHEL 8.1 source code, which is fully compatible with the upstream product.

CentOS 8 (1911) derived from RedHat Linux 8.1 Enterprise r

  • CentOS 8 (1911) derived from RedHat Linux 8.1 Enterprise released

    With the release of RedHat Linux 8.1 Enterprise, we knew that it was only a matter of time for CentOS V8 (1911) to be released. Now that it is finally here let's have a look at what this new update has in store for us.

    What's New

    Since RedHat Linux 8.1 Enterprise powers this version of CentOS, it's going to accompany all the features and improvements that came with the latest RHLE. If you've not been keeping up with RHLE, you need not worry as we're going to discuss all the changes that were implemented with this update.

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