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JBoss founder Marc Fleury quits Red Hat

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Marc Fleury, the founder of open source Java application server maker JBoss, is leaving Red Hat, which acquired JBoss last year, according to a JBoss spokesperson.

Fleury is leaving to pursue other interests, such as teaching, research in biology, music and his family, said spokesperson Chantal Yang. He had been on paternity leave since December and his resignation is effective immediately, she said.

Red Hat released this prepared statement from Fleury on Friday:

"I have done what I can to help Red Hat succeed. People need to understand that open source is a tsunami that is transforming the software industry in its wake and its inevitability is now well beyond challenge or the force of individual personality," Fleury said.

For his part, Matthew Szulik, Red Hat's CEO, praised Fleury's "positive contributions" to open-source software.

More Here, Here, and Here.


The JBoss founder is a born entrepreneur, and I'll bet he's back in the spotlight soon with another professional open-source company.

We haven't heard the last of Marc Fleury.

In a move that many in the industry had expected, Marc Fleury, founder of JBoss and often controversial open-source software has left Red Hat.

During his career at JBoss, though, Fleury was a one-man tsunami. Never afraid to take a stand, or to be flamboyant, Marc Fleury appeared during a dinner at TheServerSide Java Symposium in 2004 dressed as Batman's nemesis The Joker and shouted "This industry needs an enema!"

Fleury was also accused of posting messages to popular Java sites, such as TheServerSide and JavaLobby, under fake names, which boosted JBoss and its business model while blasting competitors.

Fleury Will Be Back

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