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Rumoured Revolution specs hit the net

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Gaming

A set of specifications purporting to be for Nintendo's Revolution console have appeared on the Internet, outlining a system with impressive graphics capabilities - but the company has confirmed that high-definition outputs won't be supported.

The specifications, which appeared on blog site Nintendo Centrium, suggest that the system will be powered by two 1.8Ghz IBM PowerPC G5 processors, a 600Mhz graphics chip from ATI and a 7.1 Digital Sound chipset.

The console will apparently sport 128MB of high speed 1T SRAM as main memory, along with 256MB of slower DRAM, while the graphics chip has 12MB of on-board high speed RAM. 6GB proprietary DVD-size discs, designed by Panasonic, would be used for Revolution's games.

The specs differ greatly from a previous "leak" last month, which claimed that the system would have a dual-core graphics chipset and a total of four processing cores, using IBM's dual-core technology.

According to Nintendo Centrium, the spec originated from a programmer currently contracted to work for Nintendo on a DS project. However, it's impossible to say how close to reality the figures actually are - but with the high speed GPU and large frame buffer, the system seems oriented towards high-definition output, which jars somewhat with a statement late last week from Nintendo of America saying that HD is off the menu for Revolution.

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