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Games: Chromebooks, Lucky Lanterns in Rocket League, Crumble

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Gaming
  • Thanks to Linux, Google and Valve are Bringing Steam to Chromebooks

    In yet another win for desktop Linux, Google and Steam are about to up the chromebook gaming field.

    On many supported chromebooks, it is already possible to run Linux applications on the chromebook. For certain user types, this has been a real boon. However, for gamers, not so much. That is about to change, thanks to a joint effort by Google and Valve.

    According to Kan Liu, Director of Product Management for Google Chrome OS, Steam is coming to chromebooks. What is Steam? Steam is a digital video game distribution service, offered by Valve, originally released in 2003 as a means for Valve to provide automatic updates for their own line of games. Eventually the service was expanded to include third-party publishers and is now one of the largest digital distribution systems for games.

  • Lucky Lanterns event is now live in Rocket League and there's a brand new arena

    Psyonix have put the Lucky Lanterns event live now in Rocket League. No update is needed today, as one went out a few days ago to prepare for it.

    Working just like previous events, giving you a special currency for playing which you can then redeem for special customization items. This time around though, there's no special game mode to play. Instead, there's an entirely new arena called The Forbidden Temple Arena.

  • Amusing sticky-tongue physics platformer 'Crumble' has a big demo update, now with multiplayer

    A rolling-ball physics platformer where you move like slime, jump like a bouncy ball and swing using a sticky tongue like a weird version of Spider Man. Crumble has a lot of fun ideas going for it and a big demo update is out now with co-op.

    Covered a few times here now, as I've absolutely loved following the progress on this one. The developer posts a lot of upcoming bits for it on Twitter, and it looks like they have some pretty amusing plans for Crumble. Including a portal that turns you into a shadow that completely warps the gameplay.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Facebook Container for Firefox, Issue Trackers, Securing Firefox with WebAssembly and Ad Hoc Profiling

  • The Facebook Container for Firefox

    Even with the ongoing #deletefacebook movement, not everyone is willing to completely walk away from the connections they’ve made on the social platform. After all, Facebook — and its subsidiary Instagram — is where the mountain biking club organizes rides, people post pet pics, dance moves catch on and life’s moments get shared with friends and family, near and far. Since the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke, Facebook has been greeted with more skepticism as it’s been under a hot spotlight on how it gathers, uses and gives access to our personal data for targeted advertising and manipulation, both on and off Facebook platforms. With recent news about their policy not to block false political ads, this targeting gets ever malicious.

  • Jira, Bugzilla, and Tales of Issue Trackers Past

    It seems as though Mozilla is never not in a period of transition. The distributed nature of the organization and community means that teams and offices and any informal or formal group is its own tiny experimental plot tended by gardeners with radically different tastes. And if there’s one thing that unites gardeners and tech workers is that both have Feelings about their tools. Tools are personal things: they’re the only thing that allows us to express ourselves in our craft. I can’t code without an editor. I can’t prune without shears. They’re the part of our work that we actually touch. The code lives Out There, the garden is Outside… but the tools are in our hands. But tools can also be group things. A shed is a tool for everyone’s tools. A workshop is a tool that others share. An Issue Tracker is a tool that helps us all coordinate work. And group things require cooperation, agreement, and compromise. While I was on the Browser team at BlackBerry I used a variety of different Issue Trackers. We started with an outdated version of FogBugz, then we had a Bugzilla fork for the WebKit porting work and MKS Integrity for everything else across the entire company, and then we all standardized on Jira.

  • Securing Firefox with WebAssembly

    Protecting the security and privacy of individuals is a central tenet of Mozilla’s mission, and so we constantly endeavor to make our users safer online. With a complex and highly-optimized system like Firefox, memory safety is one of the biggest security challenges. Firefox is mostly written in C and C++. These languages are notoriously difficult to use safely, since any mistake can lead to complete compromise of the program. We work hard to find and eliminate memory hazards, but we’re also evolving the Firefox codebase to address these attack vectors at a deeper level. Thus far, we’ve focused primarily on two techniques... [...] So today, we’re adding a third approach to our arsenal. RLBox, a new sandboxing technology developed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the University of Texas, Austin, and Stanford University, allows us to quickly and efficiently convert existing Firefox components to run inside a WebAssembly sandbox. Thanks to the tireless efforts of Shravan Narayan, Deian Stefan, Tal Garfinkel, and Hovav Shacham, we’ve successfully integrated this technology into our codebase and used it to sandbox Graphite. This isolation will ship to Linux users in Firefox 74 and to Mac users in Firefox 75, with Windows support following soon after. You can read more about this work in the press releases from UCSD and UT Austin along with the joint research paper. Read on for a technical overview of how we integrated it into Firefox.

  • Nicholas Nethercote: Ad Hoc Profiling

    I have used a variety of profiling tools over the years, including several I wrote myself. But there is one profiling tool I have used more than any other. It is capable of providing invaluable, domain-specific profiling data of a kind not obtainable by any general-purpose profiler. It’s a simple text processor implemented in a few dozen lines of code. I use it in combination with logging print statements in the programs I am profiling. No joke.

Audiocasts/Shows: GNU/Linux and Python

  • Going Linux #386 · Switching from OSX or macOS to Linux

    Episode 386 Time Stamps 00:00 Going Linux #386 · Switching from OSX or macOS to Linux 03:54 Where to look as a Mac user 05:06 Ubuntu MATE 06:16 Brave browser 07:02 Elementary OS 10:19 Zorin 14:27 What is a PPA? 15:38 Deepin 19:40 Moving from Mac is easier than moving from Windows 23:21 Let us know what you've tried 25:03 Application pick: Brave browser 27:18 goinglinux.com, goinglinux@gmail.com, +1-904-468-7889, @goinglinux, feedback, listen, subscribe 28:21 End

  • Shrimps have SSHells | LINUX Unplugged 342

    A radical new way to do SSH authentication, special guest Jeremy Stott joins us to discuss Zero Trust SSH. Plus community news, a concerning issue for makers, an Arch server follow up, and more. Special Guests: Alex Kretzschmar, Brent Gervais, Martin Wimpress, and Neal Gompa.

  • Python Bytes: #170 Visualize this: Visualizing Python's visualization ecosystem
  • Talk Python to Me: #253 Moon base geekout

    This episode is a unique one. On this episode, I've invited Richard Campbell and developer and podcaster who also dives deep into science and tech topics. We are going to dig into his geekout series and spend some time talking realistically about moonbases and space travel. I think you're really going to enjoy the conversation. But I would love to hear, either way, if you like this minor diversion from pure Python topics (although we do talk some Python and programming). We can do more like this in the future if you all enjoy listening to these as much as I enjoyed making them.

today's howtos

Bosch Rexroth adopts Ubuntu Core and snaps for app-based ctrlX Automation platform

ctrlX Automation leverages Ubuntu Core, designed for embedded devices, and snaps, the universal Linux application containers, to deliver an open source platform to remove the barriers between machine control, operation technology and information technology, or OT-IT. Industrial manufacturing solutions built on ctrlX Automation with Ubuntu Core and snaps will benefit from an open ecosystem, faster time to production and stronger security across devices’ lifecycle. Through the use of an open architecture, industrial machine manufacturers selecting ctrlX Automation are freed from being tied to PLC specialists and proprietary systems with the software being decoupled from the hardware. Read more