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Canonical introduces Anbox Cloud – scalable Android™ in the cloud

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Android
Ubuntu

Canonical today announced Anbox Cloud, a platform that containerises workloads using Android1 as a guest operating system enabling enterprises to distribute applications from the cloud. Anbox Cloud allows enterprises and service providers to deliver mobile applications at scale, more securely and independently of a device’s capabilities. Use cases for Anbox Cloud include cloud gaming, enterprise workplace applications, software testing, and mobile device virtualisation.

The ability to offload compute, storage and energy-intensive applications from devices (x86 and Arm) to the cloud enables end-users to consume advanced workloads by streaming them directly to their device. Developers can deliver an on-demand application experience through a platform that provides more control over performance and infrastructure costs, with the flexibility to scale based on user demand.

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Also: Implementing an Android™ based cloud game streaming service with Anbox Cloud

Canonical Announces Anbox Cloud, Ubuntu-Powered Scalable Android in the Cloud

Ubuntu Weekly Newslette and More

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 614

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 614 for the week of January 12 – 18, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Ubuntu Finally Removes the Amazon Web App You Never Use

    First introduced in Ubuntu 12.10, the Amazon web launcher gives Ubuntu users an easy, out-of-the-box shortcut to the Amazon website.

    And I do mean easy: an Amazon icon is pinned to the desktop launcher on all new installs by default.

Canonical announces Anbox Cloud allowing users to host Android

  • Canonical announces Anbox Cloud allowing users to host Android apps in the cloud

    Canonical has announced a new service called Anbox Cloud aimed at enterprises. With Anbox Cloud, enterprises can distribute Android apps via the cloud in a container environment. By hosting the apps in the cloud, the businesses that opt to use the service will know that the app is secure and independent of a device’s capabilities. According to Canonical, it envisions this tech being used for cloud gaming, enterprise workplace applications, software testing, and mobile device virtualisation.

    If you use Linux already, you may have seen and used Anbox if you’ve ever looked for a solution to run Android apps on the desktop. With Anbox Cloud, several Canonical technologies will be included in the software stack including the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS kernel, LXD containers, MAAS, and Juju. Additionally, Canonical’s Ubuntu Advantage support programme is included to provide continuous support and security updates for up to ten years.

Ubuntu Linux 20.04 Ditches A Feature That’s Been Annoying You

  • Ubuntu Linux 20.04 Ditches A Feature That’s Been Annoying You For Years

    You install Ubuntu and there it is: the familiar app dock with Firefox, Thunderbird, Files, the Software Center and the seemingly permanent, much-derided shortcut to Amazon.com. It’s been a fixture on the dock since 2012, but it’s about to make an exit. Yep, when Canonical’s upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Long-Term Support) release lands this April, that Amazon icon will be no more.

Canonical Gets Into Cloud Gaming & More With Anbox Cloud

  • Canonical Gets Into Cloud Gaming & More With Anbox Cloud For Cloud-Based Android Apps/Gaming

    Canonical this morning has announced Anbox Cloud for containerized workloads using Google's Android as the guest operating system.

    Canonical is advertising Anbox Cloud for enterprises wanting to distribute Android-based applications from the cloud. Interestingly, Canonical is also using Anbox Cloud to talk up "cloud gaming" with Android games but equally so also talking up possibilities for enterprise workloads, software testing, and mobile device virtualization.

Canonical debuts Anbox Cloud for highly scalable Android apps

  • Canonical debuts Anbox Cloud for highly scalable Android apps

    Canonical Ltd. has come up with a way to distribute compute-intensive applications from the cloud so they can run seamlessly on low-powered Android devices.

    The solution, announced early today, is a platform called Anbox Cloud. It uses Android as a guest operating system to containerize workloads so they can easily be distributed from the cloud, where they run, to any kind of mobile device.

    “The ability to offload compute, storage and energy-intensive applications from devices to the cloud enables end-users to consume advanced workloads by streaming them directly to their device,” Canonical noted in its pitch. “Developers can deliver an on-demand application experience through a platform that provides more control over performance and infrastructure costs, with the flexibility to scale based on user demand.”

Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Is Finally Dropping The Amazon Web App

  • Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Is Finally Dropping The Amazon Web App

    Does the Amazon web app also give you a hard time on Ubuntu?

    If yes, then it’s time to cheer for you as the much-awaited Ubuntu 20.04 “Focal Fossa” has finally removed the pre-installed amazon web launcher from the dock. Now you won’t have to worry about the affiliated search results from the Amazon in the dash.

Canonical’s New Cloud Tech Can Stream Android Apps and Games

Anbox Cloud disrupts mobile user experience

  • Anbox Cloud disrupts mobile user experience

    With the launch of the iPhone in 2007, mobile users were introduced to the smartphone as we still know it today: touchscreen, cameras and app stores. The launch of Android spurred low-cost alternatives to the iPhone, bringing the smartphone to the masses. Popularisation and growth in app consumption drove demand for mobile broadband.

    Smartphones, app stores and mobile broadband are the foundations of mobile UX today. However, we’ve been using mobile devices the same way for over a decade now. But, with Anbox Cloud delivered by telcos, this is about to change.

Canonical’s Anbox Cloud enables Android app and game streaming

  • Canonical’s Anbox Cloud enables Android app and game streaming

    While Canonical’s Ubuntu operating is one of the most popular desktop GNU/Linux distributions, the folks at Canonical have been pushing cloud services pretty hard in recent years (because that’s where the money is). The latest example? Canonical’s new Anbox Cloud solution, which lets developers host mobile apps in the cloud.

    Basically the idea is that instead of running an app or game on your phone, you’d be able to stream it over the web from a remote server. Theoretically this opens the door to running apps and games on any internet-connected device at any time, regardless of whether it’s a $100 smartphone or a $3000 laptop — because the operating system and processing power are all hosted in the cloud, which means it’s almost irrelevant how much processing power the device you’re using has.

Canonical Introduces Scalable Android-Based Cloud Platform

  • Canonical Introduces Scalable Android-Based Cloud Platform

    Canonical is deploying a scalable Android-based operating system for mobile and desktop enterprise applications from the cloud.

    The company on Tuesday announced its Anbox Cloud containerized workload platform. Anbox Cloud allows apps to be streamed to any operating system or form factor. Its uses include cloud gaming, enterprise workplace applications, software testing and mobile device virtualization.

    "Anbox Cloud is the first commercially available mobile cloud computing platform," said Galem Kayo, product manager for Ubuntu at Canonical.

Ubuntu 20.04 LTS to drop pre-installed Amazon Web App

  • Ubuntu 20.04 LTS to drop pre-installed Amazon Web App

    Canonical is finally killing off one of the most annoying features of Ubuntu. With the release of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, the Amazon Web App will no longer be pre-installed.

    Ubuntu 20.04 LTS “Focal Fossa” will mark the end of the Amazon Web App’s default inclusion in the OS. The Amazon Web App was introduced in Ubuntu 12.10 to the chagrin of many users. Many claimed that the app scraped user search results and system usage to better target ads or products sold by Amazon. Considering one of Linux’s base foundations is the protection of user privacy, the inclusion of an Amazon-centered app flew against one of the core tenants of the OS, at least in the eyes of many users.

Flinging resource-hungry apps at landfill Android? Ubuntu daddy

Canonical Launches Ubuntu-Powered Anbox Cloud

  • Canonical Launches Ubuntu-Powered Anbox Cloud

    Canonical has introduced a new platform that containerises workloads using Android as a guest operating system for virtualising mobile workloads. Called Anbox Cloud, the mobile cloud computing platform allows enterprises to distribute applications from the cloud.

    According to Canonical, Anbox Cloud runs Android on the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS kernel and allows enterprises and service providers to deliver mobile applications at scale, more securely and independently of a device's capabilities. Use cases for Anbox Cloud include cloud gaming, enterprise workplace applications, software testing, and mobile device virtualisation.

Canonical announces high-performance Android services

  • Canonical announces high-performance Android services on the cloud

    Canonical is best known for Ubuntu Linux, followed by Ubuntu's dominance on the cloud as the virtual machine (VM) operating system of choice. Now, Canonical is taking a new angle. It's building an Android app platform on top of an Ubuntu-based cloud: The Anbox Cloud.
    Why? After all, when you think Android, you're thinking of the operating system on your phone, not a cloud. The reason: Users and ISVs alike want more demanding Android applications, like high-end games, on their even bigger smartphones. Google, with its new Stadia game streaming platform, is offering a similar approach.

Canonical Puts Android Applications & Games In the Cloud

  • Canonical Puts Android Applications & Games In the Cloud

    Canonical has announced Anbox Cloud, a platform that containerizes workloads using Android as a guest operating system enabling enterprises to distribute applications from the cloud. Use cases for Anbox Cloud include cloud gaming, enterprise workplace applications, software testing, and mobile device virtualisation.

Canonical, creator of Ubuntu Linux...

  • Canonical, creator of Ubuntu Linux, wants to stream Android games and apps from the cloud

    Canonical is best known as the company behind Ubuntu, one of the most popular desktop Linux distributions. Canonical already offers many products for enterprise customers, from a lightweight OS for Internet-of-Things devices to cloud-based containers, and now it's working on a way to stream Android apps and games from the cloud.

    Anbox Cloud, as Canonical calls it, is designed to run Android games and applications on servers using LXD system containers. The apps can then be streamed to other devices, regardless of platform or form factor. "Use cases for Anbox Cloud include cloud gaming, enterprise workplace applications, software testing, and mobile device virtualization," Canonical wrote in a blog post.

    Anbox Cloud is also being touted as a great tool for developers, giving them the ability to instantly emulate "thousands of Android devices" with support for continuous integration pipelines. While it's already possible to create virtualized copies of Android phones using the emulator in Android Studio, Anbox won't require downloading large system images or a powerful PC.

Ubuntu maker Canonical’s Anbox Cloud offers remote Android apps

  • Ubuntu maker Canonical’s Anbox Cloud offers remote Android apps, games

    You might wonder why a Linux distributor would suddenly offer a cloud service that doesn’t directly involve Linux. Canonical actually already has a number of cloud-centric services and products, something that has generated a bit of controversy in Linux circles. But let’s face it, there are just some apps and services that are not available on Linux and Android may be the best way to access those.

    While Canonical boasts of how Anbox Cloud runs on Canonical’s infrastructure and Ubuntu, the real enabler here is Anbox. The open source software is one of the few existing projects that allow running Android apps on Linux. Unlike an emulator that runs the entire Android OS in a window, Anbox utilizes Linux containers to make apps feel like they were native Linux apps.

    The idea of remote Android access might be novel in itself but Canonical is also billing Anbox Cloud as its answer to the game streaming trend, potentially utilizing it as a distribution channel for mobile games. Of course, the service also has more serious uses, like accessing enterprise apps available only on Android or testing apps without having an Android device on hand.

Canonical Launches Cloud-Powered Android OS ‘Anbox’

  • [Older] Canonical Launches Cloud-Powered Android OS ‘Anbox’

    Industry leaders such as AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud have made it possible to run Windows 10 and Linux-based open source operating systems on the cloud.

    This functionality has helped many startups and enterprises flourish their businesses without setting up an infrastructure of their own and get the benefit of open source technologies.

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