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bandwhich Shows What's Taking Up Your Network Bandwidth On Linux And macOS

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Software

This tool's main purpose is to shows what is taking up your bandwidth. It was originally called "what", but its name was changed to bandwhich about 3 weeks ago.

bandwhich is able to show the current network utilization by process, connection and remote IP/hostname by sniffing a given network interface and recording the IP packet size, cross-referencing it with the /proc filesystem on Linux and lsof on macOS. Also, the tool attempts to resolve the IP addresses to their host names in the background, using reverse DNS "on a best effort basis"; this can be disabled using the -n / --no-resolve option.

By default, bandwhich runs in interactive mode and it has 3 panes that show: network utilization by process name, utilization by connection, and utilization by remote address. Because bandwhich has a responsive terminal user interface, the terminal window in which you run bandwhich must be large enough for these 3 panes to be displayed - depending on the window width and/or height, only one or two of these panes may be shown.

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