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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Operator pattern: REST API for Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

    In this article, we will see a similar pattern when writing the REST API in any known framework vs. writing an Operator using Kubernetes’ client libraries. The idea behind this article is not to explain how to write a REST API, but instead to explain the internals of Kubernetes by working with an analogy.

  • Rust framework dev says ‘I’m done with Open Source’…has second thoughts

    The main developer behind a Rust actor framework pulled the code behind the project in apparent protest against an “unsafe sh*tstorm” against him last week.

    And while the coder in question now appears to have nominated new leadership to continue the project, the apparent “ragequit” has prompted questions about the dynamics within the open source community.

    [...]

    “You could notice after each unsafe shitstorm, I started to spend less and less time with the community,” he continued. “You felt betrayed after you put so much effort and then to hear all this sh*t comments, even if you understand that that is usual internet behavior. Anyway, removing issue was a stupid idea. But I was pissed off with last two personal comments, especially while sitting and thinking how to solve the problem. I am sorry for doing that.” [SIC]

  • How to Write and Run a C Program in Linux

    Linux is becoming programming heaven for developers, being an open-source and free operating system. Turbo C compiler is already an old approach to compile programs so let us programmers move to Linux for a new programming environment. In this article,

  • TechWiser’s giant Raspberry Pi AirPod speaker (and more)

    YouTube is a haven for awesome Raspberry Pi projects, and we often spend time scanning through the platform’s wares for hidden gems. One such hidden gem is this video from TechWiser, in which they showcase some of their favourite Raspberry Pi projects:

  • A quick-and-dirty guide on how to install packages for Python

    When people start learning Python, they often will come across a package they want to try and it will usually start with "just pip install it!" The problem with that advice is it's a very simplistic view of how to manage packages and can actually lead to problems down the road. And while there is a tutorial on installing packages at packaging.python.org, it might be a bit intimidating for some if they are just looking to quickly get up and going.

    If you just want to start poking at Python and want to avoid the pitfalls to installing packages globally, it only takes 3 steps to do the right thing.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Systemd-Free antiX 19.2 Released with Latest Debian Buster Updates

Coming three months after the first point release, antiX 19.2 is here to provide the community with an up-to-date installation media for new deployments, but also to add some extra features. One of these extra features is support for the runit init system, a UNIX init scheme with service supervision, which was bacakported from Debian Sid (Unstable). If you want to install antiX with the runit init system, you must download special ISO images that are only made for 32-bit systems. The rest of the ISOs are using the sysvinit init system. Read more

Access control lists and external drives on Linux: What you need to know

Don't let confusion around external drives on Linux get the best of you, and don't limit yourself to traditional UNIX permissions. Put access control lists to work for you, and feel free to use native journaled Linux filesystems on your portable drives. Read more

This 5G smartphone comes with Android, Linux - and a keyboard. Back to the future with the Astro Slide

London-based Planet Computers is on a mission to reinvent the iconic Psion Series 5 PDA for the smartphone age. Although mobile professionals -- especially those old enough to remember the 1997 Series 5 with affection -- are often open to the idea, the company's previous efforts, the Gemini PDA and Cosmo Communicator, have had their drawbacks. The Gemini PDA, for example, is a landscape-mode clamshell device that, despite a great keyboard, is difficult to make and take calls on and only has one camera -- a front-facing unit for video calling. The Cosmo Communicator adds a small external touch screen for notifications and some basic functions plus a rear-facing camera, but you still have to open the clamshell to do anything productive. Read more