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Red Hat/IBM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenShift 4.3 and OpenSCAP

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM POWER9: An open foundation to power intelligent business decisions

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, we unveiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, the next generation of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, which provides the scale, flexibility and innovation to drive enterprise workloads across the hybrid cloud. Even with the advancements across the platform, we recognize that there’s no singular panacea to overcome every unique IT challenge. To meet these needs, Red Hat delivers specialized offerings built around Red Hat Enterprise Linux to address specific hardware, applications and environment requirements, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 continues this strategy with the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM Power Systems (POWER9).

  • OpenShift 4.3: Quay Container Security Integration

    In the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 Web UI Console, we introduced a new Cluster Overview Dashboard as the landing page when users first log in. The dashboard is there to help users resolve issues more efficiently and maintain a healthy cluster. With the latest 4.3 release, we added an image security section to the cluster health dashboard card. This section will appear on the dashboard when the Container Security Operator gets installed.

  • Deploying OpenSCAP on Satellite using Ansible

    In many environments today, security is one of the top priorities. New information security vulnerabilities are discovered regularly, and these incidents can have a significant impact on businesses and their customers. Red Hat customers I talk to are frequently looking for tools they can use to help evaluate and secure their environments.

    One of these tools is OpenSCAP, which is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and can perform compliance and vulnerability scanning on RHEL servers. Satellite makes OpenSCAP easier to use by allowing you to deploy the OpenSCAP agent to hosts, manage the OpenSCAP policies centrally, and to view OpenSCAP reports from the Satellite web interface.

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Games: GNU/Linux Gaming, Aseprite and Corona to Release Code

  • What have you been playing recently and what do you think about it?

    It's been quite some time since we last had an open discussion about what you've all been playing recently. Let's get things going again. We've almost finished the second month of 2020, we've had tons of Linux games that have released this year already and a huge amount more on the way. Now with the rise of game streaming, Steam Play Proton and more options appearing constantly there's never a shortage of gaming to be had.

  • Check out 'Aseprite' a popular cross-platform pixel-art tool to create 2D animations and sprites

    Although I'm not into game development, after finding about this popular 2D pixel animation program while researching something else, I decided to cover it here on GOL in the hopes that someone finds it useful or time saving. Aseprite is a tool developed by small Argentine developer Igara Studio, that has been around in some form for almost two decades, having its version 1.0 released on Jun 6, 2014. Right now on Steam it has 2897 positive reviews by Steam users, out of 2923 total reviews, reaching as a consequence an 'Overwhelmingly Positive' status.

  • Corona Labs announces imminent closure. Corona engine to become open source

    According to Corona Labs’ official website, the company will cease operations on May 1. The decision to close the company was made by its owner, monetization platform Appodeal, as the business’ operating expenses exceeded its revenue. Game developers will still have access to the Corona engine, and all projects created on it will continue to work. The project itself will now be distributed under a new, simplified license. It involves the unrestricted distribution of apps and games created on Corona.

Reaching Serenity: Porting Git To A Homebrew Operating System

Life is all about the little joys — such as waking up in the morning and realizing there’s still plenty of time before you have to actually get up. Or getting up anyway to watch a delightful sunrise as the city slowly wakes up, or as [Andreas Kling] chose, porting your favorite development tool to the operating system you wrote. With the aesthetics of ’90s UI design and the functionality of a simpler 2000s Unix-style system core in mind, and personal reasons to keep himself busy, [Andreas] started SerenityOS a little while back. Of course, writing your own operating system is always a great educational exercise, but it takes a certain amount of commitment to push it beyond an experimental playground phase. So ideally, you’d eventually want to use it as your actual main system, however, as software developer, [Andreas] was missing one crucial component for that: git. Well, he decided to change that and just port it — and as someone who likes to record his hacking sessions, you can watch him along the way. Read more

AOSP or 'Open' Android

  • An /e/ phone in 2020

    The /e/ phone does not offer all the apps Android does, and it might not be entirely polished yet in the re-branding experience. However, it does provide a very solid, mostly Android compatible experience without the Google bits. The /e/ team offers a wider range of hardware support than most other iOS and Android competitors, it offers most of the popular Android apps people will probably want to use (I only discovered a few missing items I wanted), and the on-line cloud services are better than those of any other phone I’ve used (including Ubuntu One and Google). I’d certainly recommend /e/ for more technical users who can work around minor rough edges and who won’t get confused by the unusual branding and semi-frequent permission prompts. I’m not sure if I’d hand one of these phones over to an Android power-user who uses a lot of niche apps, but this phone would certainly do well in the hands of, for instance, my parents or other users who tend to interact with their phones for texting, phone calls, and the calendar without using many exotic applications.

  • A 'Pixel 5' mention spotted in the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) comments

    While Google usually announces its flagship devices in October of every year, leaks and rumors of the devices begin showing up in the months leading to the launch. Details of the next-generation Pixels, however, seem to have begun leaking much earlier as there have been reports of the camera placement on Google’s upcoming flagship. Now, mentions of the “Pixel 5” in the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) code comments somewhat confirm the name and existence of such a device. The comment on a code change for the Linux kernel mentions the “Pixel 5 with (version) 4.19”, confirming the existence of a device running version 4.19 of the Linux kernel. Reports of a device running Linux kernel version 4.19 and named “bramble” have also been previously spotted. Codenames of upcoming Pixel devices leaked last month, bearing the names “redfin”, “sunfish”, and bramble” and at least one of those devices is believed to be the mid-range Pixel 4a.

  • Google Pixel 5 make appearance in Android Open Source Project

    Over the past few weeks, we have been seeing the leaks and rumors surrounding Google’s upcoming Pixel 4a smartphone. And now, details about the Pixel 5 flagship device have also surfaced. Just recently, the alleged design of the Google Pixel 5 XL leaked online. Now, Google’s next flagship has also leaked in its name. It turns out that Pixel 5 is already in the works within the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) code. The leak comes from a new code change for the Linux kernel of Android, where developer Elena Petrova – of AOSP – explains that it has only been tested in Pixel 4 and not in any new device.

  • Google ‘Pixel 5’ makes its first appearance in Android Open Source Project

    We now have potential confirmation from AOSP code comments that Google’s next mainline Pixel phone will, unsurprisingly, bear the name “Pixel 5.” The confirmation comes from a new code change for Android’s Linux kernel, which the AOSP developer explains has only been tested on the Pixel 4 and not the Pixel 5.

  • Pixel 5 surfaces in Android Open Source Project, hints at mid-range chip

    We’ve already seen an alleged render of the upcoming Google flagship, and possible codenames for the Pixel 5 and 5 XL — Redfin and Bramble — have turned up. Now, a code change submitted to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) contained comments that directly mention the Pixel 5.