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A New Linux-Exclusive Gaming Platform Is Coming: Meet GamePad

Linux is not a player-friendly platform and is generally not preferred for gaming. Still, Linux community developers do a good job by providing support for graphics drivers and new games to provide a better gaming experience. Better still, a Linux-specific gaming platform is on the way. GamePad started Kickstarter campaign as a completely Linux-specific game platform. The platform was inspired by the digital distribution platform GOG (Good Old Games) for video games and movies. GamePad is designed as a free and open source platform. So developers will be able to change the source code to add new features to the platform and customize it to create their own clients for any Linux distribution. Read more

Learn the main Linux OS components

Evolved from Unix, Linux provides users with a low-cost, secure way to manage their data center infrastructure. Due to its open source architecture, Linux can be tricky to learn and requires command-line interface knowledge as well as the expectation of inconsistent documentation. In short, Linux is an OS. But Linux has some features and licensing options that set it apart from Microsoft and Apple OSes. To understand what Linux can do, it helps to understand the different Linux OS components and associated lingo. Read more

Linux Gaming: Play Windows games on Linux with Proton

That’s why Proton is one of the biggest developments in the history of gaming on Linux. Proton is a tool developed by Valve to allow Steam users to run Windows-exclusive games under Linux. That decades-old PC game you have lying around your Steam library? You can get it up and running on Linux. Want to play more recent, critically acclaimed titles like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice? No problem – it runs on Linux. If you do most of your gaming through Steam, Proton lets you switch to Linux and still play the vast majority of your library with minimal issues. Who needs developers supporting Linux when you have Valve and Proton? Read more

Raspberry Pi Zero W based LoRaWAN gateway sells for $99

RAK Wireless’ $99 “RAK7246 LoRAWAN Developer Gateway” runs a Raspbian LoRa stack on a Raspberry Pi Zero W with a RAK2246 Pi HAT for 8x uplink channels and a single downlink. A $114 RAK7246G model adds GPS. RAK Wireless has introduced a cheaper alternative to its Raspberry Pi 4-based RAK7244 LoRaWAN Developer Gateway. The RAK7246 LoRAWAN Developer Gateway, which runs on a WiFi/BT enabled Raspberry Pi Zero W, sells for only $99 model or $114 for a RAK7246G model that is identical except for adding a Ublox MAX-7Q GPS module and a GPS antenna. Read more