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5 Reasons Why Would You Want to Use Manjaro Linux

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GNU
Linux

Manjaro is an Arch-based Linux distribution that is perceived in the community to be better than Arch for those who are less experienced in the Linux world. The distribution combines a lot of hard work and effort to offer an excellent user experience out-of-the-box. It is a very active distro nowadays.

In today’s article, we’ll give you 5 possible reasons for why you may consider using Manjaro as your daily driver OS.

[...]

Manjaro is an excellent introduction to the Arch world for those who don’t want to be fully invested in the technicalities of Arch. So much care and effort was put into it to make suitable for a lot of people out-of-the-box.

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today's howtos

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