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Openwashing Leftovers

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OSS
  • BT’s ‘open source’ approach will challenge Huawei’s dominance

    BT is seeking to challenge the dominance of Huawei over the industry by throwing its weight behind a new “open source” approach to buying essential network gear, the chief executive of Openreach has claimed.

    Clive Selley, who runs BT’s separate Openreach broadband business, said the company was seeking to push back against the existing industry structure in which a handful of suppliers, including China’s Huawei, Sweden’s Ericsson and Finland’s Nokia, hold too much power over a highly consolidated market.

    “We are trying to challenge them,” he told The Telegraph in an interview last week.

    “Because what you really want is a mix and match approach. We are trying to provoke the industry to move in that direction – more ability to mix and match [suppliers].”

  • Cloudera: Extract Benefit From All Your Data And Work Across Clouds

    We have tracked Cloudera from the very beginning and have watched as it has continually innovated in ways that help both enterprises and the open source community deliver more value. They started off on a mission to make Hadoop safe for the enterprise and then built upon that solid foundation to create full spectrum solutions for data management, security, machine learning and advanced analytics that will work on-prem, in the cloud or across hybrid clouds while maintaining security and business context of the data.

  • Hydro Protocol open-sources its most useful tools for interacting with Ethereum

    The team of Hydro Protocol, an open-source framework for building decentralized exchanges, has now open-sourced three project libraries it found most useful for interacting with the Ethereum blockchain.

    Beyond the three libraries open-sourced today, Hydro Protocol says more will be coming in the months ahead in an effort to give back to the community.

    Listed below are the first three libraries open-sourced. Utilized by the Hydro Protocol team daily, the tools could be useful to a wide spectrum of blockchain developers and enthusiasts.

  • H2O.ai Empowers MarketAxess to Innovate and Inform Trading Strategies

    H2O.ai, the open source leader in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), today announced that its open source platform, H2O, provides critical machine learning capabilities to MarketAxess, the operator of a leading electronic trading platform for fixed-income securities and the provider of market data and post-trade services for the global fixed-income markets. MarketAxess’ Composite+, powered by H2O open source, delivers greater insight and price discovery in real-time, globally, for over 24,000 corporate bonds. Composite+ has won several awards for its use of AI including the Risk Markets Technology Award for Electronic Trading Support Product of the Year and the Waters Technology American Financial Technology Award for Best Artificial Intelligence Technology Initiative.

More in Tux Machines

Ardour 6.0 Information

Our friends at Ardour have released Version 6.0, and we would like to offer them a huge congratulations! While the source code and their own builds were available on release day, many of you have been waiting for Ardour 6.0 to come to Ubuntu’s repositories. Today, that day came. Ardour 6.0 has landed in Ubuntu Groovy Gorilla (future 20.10) and will be on Ubuntu Studio’s daily spins of Groovy Gorilla within 24 hours of this writing. Unfortunately, it is not possible to backport Ardour 6.0 into Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, nor would we want to. This is because if we do, we might disrupt the workflow of people who are currently working with projects in 5.12 that are relying on its functionality and sound. Ardour 6.0 has an all-new Digital Sound Processor (DSP), and as such it may sound somewhat different. Read more

Android Leftovers

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Dear Diary – Week 32

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of computers. Before kicking off this week’s blog, there’s a few recent interesting developments that caught my eye. The first one is merely a cosmetic change. The Raspberry Pi Foundation has decided to rename Raspbian to Raspberry Pi OS. Forgive me if I accidentally forget the name change. The real news is that a new model of the RPI4 has been launched. The major improvement offered by the new model. 8GB of RAM, wow! That’s an impressive chunk of memory on a tiny computer. This development doesn’t render the 32-bit operating system obsolete. After all, the 32-bit system allows multiple processes to share all 8GB of memory, subject to the restriction that no single process can use more than 3GB. But advanced users who need to map all 8GB into the address space of a single process need a 64-bit userland. Step forward the second exciting development — a new 64-bit Raspberry Pi OS. Unsurprisingly, it’s currently in beta. Read more

Code your hardware using this open source RTOS

In general computing, an operating system is software that provides a computer's basic functions. It ensures that a computer detects and responds to peripherals (like keyboards, screens, mobile devices, printers, and so on), and it manages memory and drive space. Even though modern operating systems make it seem that multiple programs are running at the same time, a CPU core can run only a single thread at a time. Each task is executed so quickly and in such rapid succession that the result appears to be massive multi-tasking. This is managed by a subroutine called a scheduler. Read more