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Official how to switch from Windows 7 to Ubuntu Linux tutorial now available

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Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos

If you are still using Windows 7 on your computer, you are making a huge mistake. Running an unsupported operating system is pure foolishness -- there will be countless exploits in the future for which you simply won't receive patches. In other words, your data and overall online safety is now at major risk. If you insist on sticking with Microsoft's operating system, you might as well upgrade to Windows 10 -- either by installing the operating system onyour current computer or buying a new PC with the OS pre-loaded.

Understandably, many people are scared of Windows 10 -- Microsoft's data collection through extreme telemetry can make it feel like your own computer is spying on you. In that case, a Linux-based operating system should be considered. Today, Canonical releases an official guide for those thinking of switching to Ubuntu from Windows 7. Not only does the guide address potential hardware incompatibilities, but it provides a handy list of popular Windows software and its comparable Linux alternatives.

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How to upgrade from Windows 7 to Ubuntu – Hardware and software

  • How to upgrade from Windows 7 to Ubuntu – Hardware and software considerations

    A few days ago, Rhys Davies wrote a timely article, titled Why you should upgrade to Ubuntu. In it, he outlined a high-level overview of what the end of support of Windows 7 signifies for the typical user, the consideration – and advantages – of migrating to Ubuntu as an alternative, and the basic steps one should undertake to achieve this.

    We’d like to expand on this idea. We will provide a series of detailed, step-by-step tutorials that should help less tech-savvy Windows 7 users migrate from their old operating system to Ubuntu. We will start with considerations for the move, with emphasis on applications and data backup. Then, we will follow up with the installation of the new operating system, and finally cover the Ubuntu desktop tour, post-install configuration and setup.

Ubuntu Invites Windows 7 Users With Linux Switch Guides

  • Ubuntu Invites Windows 7 Users With Linux Switch Guides

    Canonical today published the first part of a tutorial series designed to help Windows 7 users migrate to Ubuntu Linux after Microsoft's decade-old OS reached end of support this month and stopped receiving security and bug fixes.

    "We will provide a series of detailed, step-by-step tutorials that should help less tech-savvy Windows 7 users migrate from their old operating system to Ubuntu," Canonical developer advocate Igor Ljubuncic said.

    Today's post covers the steps before the actual migration and the data backup stage, and it will be followed by other tutorials detailing the installation steps as well as the post-install configuration and desktop environment setup process.

    While Windows 7 refugees also have the option to upgrade to Windows 10 or to buy a new computer with an operating system under active support such as macOS or Windows 10, Canonical would gladly have them switch to its free Ubuntu Linux distribution.

Still On Windows 7? Canonical Says It’s Time To Switch To Linux

  • Still On Windows 7? Canonical Says It’s Time To Switch To Linux

    Windows 7 reached its end of support deadline quite recently. It clearly means that Windows 7 devices are no longer eligible for technical support and security updates. If you are one of those loyal Windows 7 fans who haven’t upgraded yet, your production machine is prone to serious potential risks.

    However, Microsoft recommends its users that they should upgrade to the latest version of Windows as soon as possible. Notably, there are two ways to switch to Windows 10. You can either clean install the operating system or purchase a new system with pre-installed Windows 10 OS.

    Speaking of Windows 10, we can not deny the fact that thousands of users are still hesitant to upgrade to Windows 10. Their hesitation is pretty much obvious because of the series of bugs that come along with each update.

    This is one of the reasons many people are now looking for a Linux-based operating system. But many of them don’t have any idea about the upgrade process. They are concerned about the hardware incompatibility issues and more.

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