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Kali Linux 2020.1 Release

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Linux

We are here to kick off our first release of the decade, with Kali Linux 2020.1! Available for immediate download.

Throughout the history of Kali (and its predecessors BackTrack, WHAX, and Whoppix), the default credentials have been root/toor. This is no more. We are no longer using the superuser account, root, as default in Kali 2020.1. The default user account is now a standard, unprivileged, user.

For more of the reasons behind this switch, please see our previous blog post. As you can imagine, this is a very large change, with years of history behind it. As a result, if you notice any issues with this, please do let us know on the bug tracker.

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Kali Linux Ethical Hacking OS Gets First 2020 Release

  • Kali Linux Ethical Hacking OS Gets First 2020 Release

    Offensive Security kicks of 2020 with the first release of their Kali Linux ethical hacking and penetration testing GNU/Linux distribution, Kali Linux 2020.1.

    The Kali Linux 2020.1 release is now available for download and it looks like it packs quite some goodies for fans of the Debian-based operating system, including non-root by default. This means that Kali Linux 2020.1 is the first release to use a standard, unprivileged user account (kali/kali) by default instead of the superuser account (root/toor), except for the ARM images.

    The second biggest change in Kali Linux 2020.1 is the availability of a single installer image for all supported desktop environments. Therefore, there won’t be separate images of Kali Linux for each desktop environment, which means that, when they want to install Kali Linux, users will have to download a single image and choose their preferred desktop environment.

Kali Linux 2020.1 Now Available for Download

  • Kali Linux 2020.1 Now Available for Download

    Beginning with this release, if you run the live version of Kali, both the default user and password are “kali.” On the other hand, if you install the distro, you are prompted to create a non-root user with administrative privileges.

    “Tools that we identify as needing root access, as well as common administrative functions such as starting/stopping services, will interactively ask for administrative privileges (at least when started from the Kali menu),” the dev team explains.

Kali Linux 2020.1 released: New tools, Kali NetHunter rootless

  • Kali Linux 2020.1 released: New tools, Kali NetHunter rootless, and more!

    Offensive Security have released Kali Linux 2020.1, which is available for immediate download. The popular open source project, which is heavily relied upon in the pentest community, is introducing several new features, including new packages and tools. The key new features include:

    Changes in the default credentials – Kali is abandoning the default ‘root/toor’ credentials and moving to ‘kali/kali’. This is a very big change as root has been the default for Kali since its inception.

Kali Linux 2020.1 Switches To Non-Root User By Default

  • Kali Linux 2020.1 Switches To Non-Root User By Default, New Single Installer Image

    For the latest Kali Linux 2020.1, released yesterday, the developers have decided to go with a traditional default non-root user model. Other changes in this Kali Linux release include a single installer image instead of separate images for every desktop environment, rootless mode for Kali NetHunter, and more.

    Kali Linux is a Debian Testing based Linux distribution created for digital forensics and penetration testing, which comes with hundreds of tools preinstalled.

    [...]

    The Kali developers note that while there's nothing stopping users from using Kali Linux as their main OS, just like before, they still don't encourage this. But the change to a non-root default user will make it easier for those that want this.

    The main reason for not recommending the usage Kali Linux as the main OS is that it's not tested for this kind of usage, and the Kali developers don't want the influx of bug reports that come with it.

    If you do, however, run Kali as your main OS, you'll probably want to switch from the rolling branch to kali-last-snapshot for more stability.

Kali Linux 2020.1 is here with a new theme and single installer

  • Kali Linux 2020.1 is here with a new theme and single installer image

    The minds behind Kali Linux, namely Offensive Security, started the decade with a new update that focuses on improving the user interface, making installation more straightforward, and abandoning the root user model.

    If you haven’t heard much about Kali Linux, it makes sense to first introduce it to you all before getting to its latest version details. It is an operating system that is powered by Debian and focuses on penetration testing and ethical hacking.

Kali Linux 2020.1 Released

  • Kali Linux 2020.1 Released, Download Now!!!

    Offensive Security recently announced its first release of 2020, Kali Linux 2020.1 for penetration tests and forensic analysis.

    This Kali release brings several new improvements, including the highly-anticipated non-root by default.

    For those unaware, Kali Linux is one of the best Linux distros for hackers, pen-tester, and security researchers due to the fact that most of the hacking tools that are available online are built-in this Linux Distro.

  • Kali Linux 2020.1 allows hackers to use NetHunter without rooting their phones.

    As a kid when I heard of the term hacking, it immediately translated to me typing away at multiple screens and accessing everything I wanted to. And in doing so, guess which operating system appeared as the foremost choice, a no brainer? Kali Linux.

    Perhaps, this can be attributed to a huge range of tools that come pre-installed with it. Regardless, it is an essential part of every ethical hacker’s toolkit and with its release of a new version today titled Kali Linux 2020.1, we have an array of new features and updates to be excited about.

Kali Linux Adds Single Installer Image

  • Kali Linux Adds Single Installer Image, Default Non-Root User

    Kali Linux 2020.1 was released today by the Kali Linux team at Offensive Security with a new Kali Single Installer image for all desktop environments and a previously announced move to a non-root default user.

    The ethical hacking distribution's first release of this decade also comes with changes to its NetHunter pentesting platform that now can be used with unrooted Android devices.

    Also, Kali Linux 2020.1 adds seveeral new tools since 2019.4 was released, including cloud-enum, emailharvester, phpggc, sherlock, and splinter to name just a few.

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