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Mozilla: Thunderbird’s New Home, React, TenFourFox, Chromecast Extension For Firefox, 'Mozilla’s Rebel Alliance'

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Thunderbird: Thunderbird’s New Home

    As of today, the Thunderbird project will be operating from a new wholly owned subsidiary of the Mozilla Foundation, MZLA Technologies Corporation. This move has been in the works for a while as Thunderbird has grown in donations, staff, and aspirations. This will not impact Thunderbird’s day-to-day activities or mission: Thunderbird will still remain free and open source, with the same release schedule and people driving the project.

    There was a time when Thunderbird’s future was uncertain, and it was unclear what was going to happen to the project after it was decided Mozilla Corporation would no longer support it. But in recent years donations from Thunderbird users have allowed the project to grow and flourish organically within the Mozilla Foundation. Now, to ensure future operational success, following months of planning, we are forging a new path forward. Moving to MZLA Technologies Corporation will not only allow the Thunderbird project more flexibility and agility, but will also allow us to explore offering our users products and services that were not possible under the Mozilla Foundation. The move will allow the project to collect revenue through partnerships and non-charitable donations, which in turn can be used to cover the costs of new products and services.

  • react-content-marker Released – Marking Content with React

    Last year, in a React side-project, I had to replace some content in a string with HTML markup. That is not a trivial thing to do with React, as you can't just put HTML as string in your content, unless you want to use dangerouslySetInnerHtml — which I don't. So, I hacked a little code to smartly split my string into an array of sub-strings and DOM elements.

    More recently, while working on Translate.Next — the rewrite of Pontoon's translate page to React — I stumbled upon the same problem. After looking around the Web for a tool that would solve it, and coming up short handed, I decided to write my own and make it a library.

    [...]

    The first thing to note is that you can pass any number of parsers to the createMarker function, and they will all be called in turn. The order of the parsers is very important though, because content that has already been marked will not be parsed again. Let's look at another example.

    Say you have a rule that matches content between brackets: /({.*})/, and a rule that matches content between brackets that contain only capital letters: /({[A-W]+})/. Now let's say you are marking this content: I have {CATCOUNT} cats. Whichever rule you passed first will match the content between brackets, and the second rule will not apply. You thus need to make sure that your rules are ordered so that the most important ones come first. Generally, that means you want to have the more specific rules first.

  • TenFourFox FPR19b1 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 19 beta 1 is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). I was originally going to do more iteration on Reader mode in FPR19, but in a possible recurrence of the issue that broke SourceForge downloads temporarily, a user reported on Tenderapp they had a site that was failing in the same way.
    On the test system I was able to reproduce the problem and it was due to the selected cipher having insufficient cryptographic strength to pass HTTP/2 TLS profile validation. The selected cipher was one I added as a stopgap for FPR7 to fix another site which was still working (and did not use HTTP/2, hence it didn't exhibit the issue). Disabling that cipher restored the new failing site, but caused the site I put the workaround for in FPR7 to fail, so in no situation could I get both sites to be happy with the set available. Although I didn't really want to do this, the only real solution here was to upgrade NSS, the underlying cryptographic library, to add additional more modern ciphers to replace the older one that now needed to be reverted. With this in place and some other fixes, now both sites work, and this probably fixes others.

  • Chromecast Extension For Firefox fx_cast 0.0.5 Adds Support For YouTube, Subtitles For Local Media

    fx_cast, a tool that enables Chromecast support for Firefox web browser, has been updated to version 0.0.5 with some new features and bug fixes. This release includes support for finding and converting local SubRip (.srt) subtitle files for local media casting, an important fix that gets YouTube casting to work correctly, and more.

    fx_cast is made of two parts: a Firefox extension and a companion application that needs to run in the background on the same machine as the extension. This companion bridge application is needed to connect with the receiver devices in order to get around Google's proprietary protocol.

    It's important to note that fx_cast is in the pre-beta phase, and is considered "incomplete and likely buggy". It supports casting web apps like Netflix or BBC iPlayer, HTML5 video and screen/tab sharing.

  • Mapping the power of Mozilla’s Rebel Alliance

    At Mozilla, we often speak of our contributor communities with gratitude, pride and even awe. Our mission and products have been supported by a broad, ever-changing rebel alliance — full of individual volunteers and organizational contributors — since we shipped Firefox 1.0 in 2004. It is this alliance that comes up with new ideas, innovative approaches and alternatives to the ongoing trends towards centralisation and an internet that doesn’t always work in the interests of people.

    But we’ve been unable to speak in specifics. And that’s a problem, because the threats to the internet we love have never been greater. Without knowing the strength of the various groups fighting for a healthier internet, it’s hard to predict or achieve success.

    We know there are thousands around the globe who help build, localize, test, de-bug, deploy, and support our products and services. They help us advocate for better government regulation and ‘document the web’ through the Mozilla Developer Network. They speak about Mozilla’s mission and privacy-preserving products and technologies at conferences around the globe. They help us host events around the globe too, like this year’s 10th anniversary of MozFest, where participants hacked on how to create a multi-lingual, equitable internet and so much more.

    With the publication of the Mozilla and the Rebel Alliance report, we can now speak in specifics. And what we have to say is inspiring. As we rise to the challenges of today’s internet, from the injustices of the surveillance economy to widespread misinformation and the rise of untrustworthy AI, we take heart in how powerful we are as a collective.

More on Thunderbird's New Stewardship

  • Thunderbird Mail Client Now Being Pushed Along By "MZLA Technologies Corporation"

    Mozilla's Thunderbird mail client has been rather neglected the past several years with all the focus on the Firefox web browser, but as the next step forward for this mail/RSS client is now placing it under the newly-formed MZLA Technologies Corporation.

    MZLA Technologies Corporation is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Mozilla Foundation. By placing it under this new corporation, the hope is it will open new doors for Thunderbird and in turn more funding.

  • Thunderbird’s New Home

    As of today, the Thunderbird project will be operating from a new wholly owned subsidiary of the Mozilla Foundation, MZLA Technologies Corporation. This move has been in the works for a while as Thunderbird has grown in donations, staff, and aspirations. This will not impact Thunderbird’s day-to-day activities or mission: Thunderbird will still remain free and open source, with the same release schedule and people driving the project.

LWN on Thunderbird

Open source email client Thunderbird finds a new home

  • Open source email client Thunderbird finds a new home

    If you prefer to access your email through a desktop client, then Thunderbird is one of the better choices. However, the future of the open source tool has been a little rocky in recent years after the Mozilla Corporation decided to stop supporting it.

    However, there’s a lot of love for Thunderbird out there, and it’s managed to survive, and even grow thanks to user donations. And now the email client has found a new home.

    Thunderbird’s Philipp Kewisch says: "As of today, the Thunderbird project will be operating from a new wholly owned subsidiary of the Mozilla Foundation, MZLA Technologies Corporation."

Thunderbird coverage today at opensource.com

  • ProtonVPN adopts GPLv3, Mozilla Thunderbird gets new home, and more news

    What a difference a few years makes. When the Mozilla Foundation announced in 2015 that it was considering spinning off the Thunderbird email client, the software's adherents feared the worst. Since then, Thunderbird has persisted but its fate has also been up in the air. That's changed with the formation of MZLA Technologies Corporation.

    MZLA Technologies is "a new wholly owned subsidiary of the Mozilla Foundation" that's the new home of the Thunderbird project. The move to the new corporation means that development will continue on the software and that move "won’t have an impact on Thunderbird’s day-to-day running." According to Thunderbird's Phillip Kewisch, shifting the project to MZLA Technologies enables it to "explore offering our users products and services that were not possible under the Mozilla Foundation."

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