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Raspberry Pi Is Getting Vulkan Support

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Linux

The Raspberry Pi Foundation announced today that it has started working on implementing support for the open-source Vulkan graphics API for their Raspberry Pi single-board computers.

While the latest Raspberry Pi 4 board is OpenGL ES 3.1 conformant, the company also wants to add support for the famous open-source Vulkan driver, which provides high-efficiency access to modern GPUs and better performance than the older OpenGL driver.

But don’t get too excited about this because the Raspberry Pi Foundation is just getting started on this Vulkan on Raspberry Pi thing, which will be big for gaming on the tiny boards.

Read more

Raspberry Pi Foundation Gets Back To Working On A Vulkan Driver

  • Raspberry Pi Foundation Gets Back To Working On A Vulkan Driver - New Effort By Igalia

    With the V3D Gallium3D driver hitting OpenGL ES 3.1 compliance, the Raspberry Pi Foundation and their partners have turned to focusing on getting their Vulkan driver off the ground for Raspberry Pi 4 and future SBCs.

    Eric Anholt at Broadcom back in 2018 before leaving the company had started a Broadcom Vulkan driver for the VideoCore IV graphics hardware as found now in the Raspberry Pi 4. That was the "BCMV" driver while there also has been an "rpi-vulkan-driver" effort too. But now Igalia under contract with Broadcom / Raspberry Pi Foundation has begun writing a new Vulkan driver.

Vulkan is coming to Raspberry Pi: first triangle

  • Vulkan is coming to Raspberry Pi: first triangle

    Following on from our recent announcement that Raspberry Pi 4 is OpenGL ES 3.1 conformant, we have some more news to share on the graphics front. We have started work on a much requested feature: an open-source Vulkan driver!

Raspberry Pi 4 graphics win: Open-source Vulkan driver support

  • Raspberry Pi 4 graphics win: Open-source Vulkan driver support is coming

    Raspberry Pi designer the Raspberry Pi Foundation is working on delivering a new open-source Vulkan driver, a graphics application programming interface (API) that could mean higher-quality and faster graphics for the tiny computer.

    Vulkan support is now common among Android smartphones and has long been backed by Samsung to improve graphics and games on Galaxy devices, and is supported by gaming heavyweights like Valve on SteamOS.

Raspberry Pi 4 is Now OpenGL ES 3.1 Conformant, Work on Vulkan

Open source Vulkan driver coming to Raspberry Pi

  • Open source Vulkan driver coming to Raspberry Pi

    Raspberry Pi boss Eben Upton has announced that work has begun on an open source Vulkan driver. This news comes hot on the heels of the announcement that the Raspberry Pi 4 is OpenGL ES 3.1 conformant.

    Regular HEXUS readers will be well aware of the Vulkan API and its value to PC developers , as well as its growing influence on a wide range of platforms like MacOS, Linux and Android. As Upton mentions in his blog post, the Vulkan API has been designed to make the most of modern compute / graphics hardware - addressing common bottlenecks in OpenGL.

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