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When will we hear the end of computer quacks?

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Misc

It seems no matter how much you think you know, the information architects and desktop Feng-Shui consultants want you to believe that you know nothing. Then they can explain all their gibberish and snake-oil solutions to you. And if you don't watch it, they'll steal your own ideas - and then sell them back to you!

Case in point: Don Norman, and his diploma which I'm sure is one that MIT regrets handing out. Check it out: Don Norman discovered command line interfaces! And he's about to take his discovery to the press! Yes, he thinks this is an original discovery all his own. Windows Vista uses a command line, and all of a sudden the interface that was holding Linux back is the same interface that's pushing Windows forward! Suddenly the advanced power of commands isn't just for elitist eggheads.

More Here.

re:quacks

Except to see his own blathering prose in type - was there a purpose to this article that I missed? Anyone? Bueller? Anyone?

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