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When will we hear the end of computer quacks?

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It seems no matter how much you think you know, the information architects and desktop Feng-Shui consultants want you to believe that you know nothing. Then they can explain all their gibberish and snake-oil solutions to you. And if you don't watch it, they'll steal your own ideas - and then sell them back to you!

Case in point: Don Norman, and his diploma which I'm sure is one that MIT regrets handing out. Check it out: Don Norman discovered command line interfaces! And he's about to take his discovery to the press! Yes, he thinks this is an original discovery all his own. Windows Vista uses a command line, and all of a sudden the interface that was holding Linux back is the same interface that's pushing Windows forward! Suddenly the advanced power of commands isn't just for elitist eggheads.

More Here.


Except to see his own blathering prose in type - was there a purpose to this article that I missed? Anyone? Bueller? Anyone?

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