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SUSE/OpenSUSE Interviews and How SLE is Built

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Interviews
SUSE
  • People of openSUSE: An Interview with Ish Sookun

    I joined the “Ambassador” program in 2009, which later was renamed to openSUSE Advocate, and finally the program was dropped. In 2013, I joined the openSUSE Local Coordinators to help coordinating activities in the region. It was my way of contributing back. During those years, I would also test openSUSE RCs and report bugs, organize local meetups about Linux in general (some times openSUSE in particular) and blog about those activities. Then, in 2018 after an inspiring conversation with Richard Brown, while he was the openSUSE Chairman, I stepped up and joined the openSUSE Elections Committee, to volunteer in election tasks. It was a nice and enriching learning experience along with my fellow election officials back then, Gerry Makaro and Edwin Zakaria. I attended my first openSUSE Conference in May 2019 in Nuremberg. I did a presentation on how we’re using Podman in production in my workplace. I was extremely nervous to give this first talk in front of the openSUSE community but I met folks who cheered me up. I can’t forget the encouragement from Richard, Gertjan, Harris, Doug, Marina and the countless friends I made at the conference. Later during the conference, I was back on the stage, during the Lightning Talks, and I spoke while holding the openSUSE beer in one hand and the microphone in the other. Nervousness was all gone thanks to the magic of the community.

    Edwin and Ary told me about their activities in Indonesia, particularly about the openSUSE Asia Summit. When the CfP for oSAS 2019 was opened, I did not hesitate to submit a talk, which was accepted, and months later I stood among some awesome openSUSE contributors in Bali, Indonesia. It was a great Summit where I discovered more of the openSUSE community. I met Gerald Pfeifer, the new chairman of openSUSE, and we talked about yoga, surrounded by all of the geeko fun, talks and workshops happening.

  • SUSE Hack Week Spotlight: Xabier Arbulu

    My name is Xabier Arbulu and I’m from Spain (Basque country), even though I live in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria enjoying a better weather. I have been working as a Software engineer around 6 years now, and I joined SUSE a bit more than a year ago. One of the major motivations was that I wanted to feel and explore how is to work in an organization where Open Source is more than just business. I really think that collaboration and transparency are the way to go. I work in the SLES4SAP and HA team where we provide solutions to the customers with critical mission applications.

    One of my hobbies is to enjoy the nature (and the sports around this like hiking, surfing…), so it’s totally aligned with the path that SUSE started against the climate change and our planet conservation.

  • SUSE Hack Week Spotlight: William Brown

    My name is William Brown, I’m a senior software engineer at SUSE. I’m from Brisbane Australia, and have been a software engineer for 5 years. Previously I was a system administrator at a major Australian university for 7 years. I am a photographer and also participate in judo and pole dance in my free time.

  • How SUSE builds its Enterprise Linux distribution – PART 3

    As for the “Minor Versions” of SLE, we decided (more than 14 years ago) to use a “Service Pack” Model for our SLE releases. The goal is to offer a predictable release cadence allowing our users to plan accordingly for their updates, but also to schedule our release with collections of maintenance updates and new features alike for a given major version. Back in the old days we promised to release a Service Pack every 12 to 18 months, but since SLE 12 GA (more than 5 years ago) we have decided to simplify and increase the regularity of our cadence by settling on a 12-month release cycle and supports previous service packs for 6 months after the release of the new service pack.

    Why? Well, this decision was made based on our customers’ and partners’ feedback and also because of the general increase in the cadence of open source development. For example, just to name a few other open source projects, did you know that there is a upstream Linux Kernel minor version every two months, Mozilla is releasing a new Firefox version every 6 weeks, and GNOME creates a full stable release every 6 months?

    Having two major SLE versions available with an annual release cadence for every “Minor Version”, which would normally be called a “Service Pack”, is part of our solution to solving the challenge of keeping up with the pace of open source projects, while at the same time offering choice and clarity to all our enterprise users.
    We will discuss the SLE Release Schedule in a dedicated blog post, but before getting too technical, we would like to give you a deeper insight into our Release Management Team, i.e. the people and team behind these release processes.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Veloren, Steam, Humble Choice and More

  • Interviewed - Veloren, an upcoming FOSS multiplayer voxel RPG

    Today we have something a bit special for you, an interview with one of the team working to produce the free and open source multiplayer voxel RPG named Veloren. Recently, the Veloren team put out their 0.6 release, bringing a lot of extra content to try out and so we felt this was a good time to have a chat about the project.

  • Wave of EA games hit Steam, including Dragon Age 2 and Dragon Age: Inquisition

    These older EA games hit Steam alongside Command & Conquer Remastered Collection, which comes out on PC today. The revived strategy classic includes mod support with Steam Workshop, and is one of the first major RTS franchises to open source its source code under the GPL.

  • Steal everything and flee from the Burning Knight - out now

    With some great lighting work, furious action and a good sprinkle of comedy Burning Knight is an fast-paced roguelike that's out now. Note: key provided by the developer. It's…ridiculous. I mean that in the nicest way I can because I'm at a loss for a better word. The whole game is just pure madness and a massive amount of fun. Much like other similar titles that came before including Nuclear Throne and Enter the Gungeon, it's got that supremely satisfying gameplay loop nailed down perfectly. Run through various floors as you dodge roll, shoot and slice your way through everything. [...] Hilariously, the shop is clearly selling dubious wares just take a look at the shopkeeper and tell me that's not a robber, just look at the mask! You can even start a fight with them, much to my surprise when accidentally clicking next to them and they asked me to stop. So for science, I hit them a few more times and they got very angry and starting running around super fast, firing everywhere. Even though I had clearly done it to myself, it was a bit of a shock but super funny especially with the Burning Knight cheering them on against me.

  • Valve moves the Steam Game Festival to June 16

    The upcoming Steam Game Festival Summer Edition has been delayed, as confirmed in a Valve email today. Originally due from June 9 - 15, they've now moved it to June 16 - 22. No reason was given and their email on it was extremely brief. It's not really unexpected though at this point, practically every other major event has also been postponed. This is all in response to the ongoing situation in America right now, after the death of George Floyd who died at hands of Minneapolis police officers.

  • June's Humble Choice is out with Supraland, Overload, Barotrauma and more

    Looks like the June 2020 Humble Choice is a pretty good one filled with some highly rated games. Time to take a quick look over what's on offer. Humble Choice (prev Humble Monthly) is a curated bundle that changes each month. You pick a tier with different prices to get access to the huge Humble Trove (a collection of DRM-free games) plus a Humble Store discount and then you pick between 3-9 games to keep. This month you can pick from (bold titles support Linux): Barotrauma Overload Remnants of Naezith Stygian: Reign of the Old Ones Supraland

Wine 5.10

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.10 is now available.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - More progress on the WineD3D Vulkan backend.
      - Beginnings of a separate Unix library for NTDLL.
      - Better support for anti-cheat kernel drivers.
      - More glyph substitutions in DirectWrite.
      - Support for DSS private keys.
      - ARM64 exception handling fixes.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.10.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.10.tar.xz
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 5.10 Starts Work On A Unix Library For NTDLL, More WineD3D Vulkan

    Wine 5.10 is out as the latest bi-weekly development release of this open-source project for allowing Windows games and applications to run generally gracefully on Linux (and other) platforms. Wine 5.10 continues the recent trend of bringing up the Vulkan back-end for WineD3D for this Direct3D 9/10/11 implementation to allow it to run atop Vulkan rather than needing to map it over OpenGL. With Wine 5.10 more functionality is in place but doesn't appear to be good yet for gamers compared to the OpenGL code-path or most notably the out-of-tree DXVK project providing great Direct3D 9/10/11 support over Vulkan and is what is notably used at the moment by Steam Play (Proton).

  • Wine 5.10 out with more WineD3D Vulkan work and anti-cheat improvements

    Alexandre Julliard, CodeWeavers staffer and Wine hacker today announced the Wine 5.10 development release with some more exciting work. They've continued progressing Vulkan support for WineD3D, there's the beginnings of a separate Unix library for NTDLL, more glyph substitutions in DirectWrite, support for DSS private keys, ARM64 fixes and other various bug fixes included. Something bigger came with Wine 5.10 though too, as they also mentioned it has better support for anti-cheat kernel drivers. That's going to be the big one if it's possible to get working properly. Anti-cheat as a whole is the Achilles heel of Wine (and so Steam Play Proton too), as it's often the cause of Windows games being unable to work on Linux through the compatibility layer so it's pleasing to know more work is going on.

Android Leftovers

RK3399Pro module available in $199 and up dev kit

Firefly’s open-spec, $119-and-up “Core-3399Pro-JD4” module runs Linux or Android on a 3-TOPS NPU-enabled RK3399Pro. The module is available as part of a $199 and up “AIO-3399PRO-JD4” dev kit. While we were reporting on the Rockchip RK3399-based Station P1 Geek Mini PC and Face X2 facial recognition device this week we noticed another Rockchip based product from T-Chip Technology’s Firefly unit that was announced in March. We have yet to see any press coverage of the Core-3399Pro-JD4 module, which runs Linux or Android on the RK3399Pro. Read more