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Python Programming: Designing Big Picture, Test and Code, Copied Talk and Learning to Code On the Go

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Development
  • Designing Big Picture

    Web design encompasses many different skills and disciplines in the production and maintenance of websites. The different areas of web design include web graphic design; interface design; authoring, including standardised code and proprietary software; user experience design; and search engine optimization. Often many individuals will work in teams covering different aspects of the design process, although some designers will cover them all

  • Test and Code: 100: A/B Testing - Leemay Nassery

    Let's say you have a web application and you want to make some changes to improve it.
    You may want to A/B test it first to make sure you are really improving things.

    But really what is A/B testing?

    That's what we'll find out on this episode with Leemay Nassery.

  • Re-using my presentations

    Yesterday I got an email saying that someone in Turkey had stolen one of my presentations. The email included a YouTube link. The video showed a meetup. The presenter (I’ll call him Samuel) was standing in front of a title slide in my style that said, “Big-O: How Code Slows as Data Grows,” which is the title of my PyCon 2018 talk.

    The video was in Turkish, so I couldn’t tell exactly what Samuel was saying, but I scrolled through the video, and sure enough, it was my entire talk, complete with illustrations by my son Ben.

  • Mobile Apps for Learning to Code On the Go, Even in Space

    In a way, programming is like riding a bicycle. You won’t know how to write code unless you do it for a while. In other words, this skill requires much practice to learn and even more support.

    There are several ways one can get started: buy books, watch videos on YouTube, or go the more traditional route and join classes at an educational institute. However, the most convenient way to start your journey is right here at your fingertips.

    Mobile apps that teach you to code have become increasingly popular. And this is not a surprise: with the whole programming course right here on your smartphone; you can learn to code on the go. Whether you’re stuck in a queue or traffic jam, have 10 minutes before going to bed or go somewhere in a bus — open an app and level up your skills.

    That’s why I’ve compiled a list of coding applications that will help you stay up to date, no matter what level you are and what programming language you decided to learn.

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