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Red Hat: 'Edge', Nick Hopman on Automation, Scaling Ceph and OpenShift Commons Briefing

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Shares ― Edge computing

    Organizations are increasingly turning to edge computing for Internet of Things (IoT) devices and new applications that require real-time processing power. Learn what edge computing is and what it can do for you.

  • How to get started with automation: A Red Hat exec offers advice

    As enterprises digitize in an effort to keep pace with their customers, more leaders seek the holy grail of automation. Automation can help speed time to market and breed greater efficiency. Most companies, however, aren't naturally inclined to automate their processes, even though 71% say they're at least kicking the tires on automation.

    Red Hat's Nick Hopman, Vice President of Global Professional Services Practices, Solutions, and Offerings, sat down with me to talk through how organizations can best implement automation rather than just aspire to it.

  • Scaling Ceph to a billion objects and beyond

    This is the sixth in Red Hat Ceph object storage performance series. In this post we will take a deep dive and learn how we scale tested Ceph with more than one billion objects, and share the performance secrets we discovered in the process. To better understand the performance results shown in this post, we recommend reviewing the first blog , where we detailed the lab environment, performance toolkit, and methodology used.

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift Container Storage 4.2 Overview with Marcel Hergaarden (Red Hat)

    In this OpenShift Commons Briefing, Marcel Hergaarden (Red Hat) gives a technical overview of OpenShift Container Storage and walk us thru the road map for upcoming releases.

    Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage is software-defined storage integrated with and optimized for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. OpenShift Container Storage 4.2 is built on Red Hat Ceph® Storage, Rook, and NooBaa to provide container native storage services that support block, file, and object services. For the initial 4.2 release, OpenShift Container Storage will be supported on OpenShift platforms deployed on Amazon Web Services and VMware. It will anywhere OpenShift does: on-premise or in the public cloud.

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