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Programming Leftovers

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  • The 20 Best PHP Frameworks for Modern Developers in 2020

    Programming languages encompass the tech world, and we, living in the 21st century, are seeing a historical change. As we all know, these languages are widely used for developing various apps, mobile phone system, etc. and thereby, the demand for these is increasing rapidly over time among developers. Among the different scripting dialects, the language which has secured practically 80% of the site market and tech world is PHP. PHP is utilized to fabricate sites and web applications. The use of PHP frameworks improves the intricate procedure of development by giving a stage where the engineers can work without much of a stretch form PHP applications in the briefest time conceivable.

  • A new hash algorithm for Git

    The Git source-code management system is famously built on the SHA‑1 hashing algorithm, which has become an increasingly weak foundation over the years. SHA‑1 is now considered to be broken and, despite the fact that it does not yet seem to be so broken that it could be used to compromise Git repositories, users are increasingly worried about its security. The good news is that work on moving Git past SHA‑1 has been underway for some time, and is slowly coming to fruition; there is a version of the code that can be looked at now.

  • Git commit reordering

    While I was working for a presentation for kid’s school at Magnetic field, Aurora, Lunar Phases and Rockets, I added 4 big videos to the presentation (as I was going to use them offline while presenting).

    I know what git is not the place for big binary files, and even Github proposed to use the LFS backend for that, but as it was just temporary, I went ahead.

    After that commit, I also wrote two more articles, the one on Lego Speed Champions and the one on Galleria.io and PhotoSwipe, so it became a problem to have big files in between, when my plan was to remove them in the end.

  • Qt World Summit 2019 talk videos are online

    Were you there, but you couldn’t attend that talk or two that you really wanted to see because the conference was so, so packed with awesome content?

    Fear no more! We are glad to announce that the talks at the past Qt World Summit 2019 in Berlin (or QtWS19, for the friends) have been video recorded and are now available online! You can now catch up with the latest news, improvements and best practices around Qt and its ecosystem, all from the comfort of your sofa office chair.

    We have gathered all the talks given by KDAB engineers on this summary page, where you can find also more information about the contents of each talk and download the slides.

  • OpenBLAS 0.3.8 Brings More AVX2/AVX512 Kernels, Other Optimizations

    For those using OpenBLAS as your BLAS (Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms) implementation, OpenBLAS 0.3.8 was released this weekend and coming with it are more AVX2/AVX-512 kernels and other optimizations.

    OpenBLAS continues striving to compete with Intel's MKL and other optimized BLAS implementations and with more AVX2 and AVX-512 should help with the performance on the latest Intel and AMD CPUs. There is now an AVX-512 DGEMM kernel, the AVX-512 SGEMM kernel was "significantly" improved, and new AVX-512 optimized kernels for CGEMM and ZGEMM. On the AVX2 front the kernels for STRMM, SGEMM, and CGEMM are said to have been significantly sped-up along with new kernels for CGEMM3M and ZGEMM3M.

  • Egad not more PAWs posts Sad

    Well back on my PAWS run again. This one might be a rather short series as I am really just looking at one Action in the Kinesis API 'SubscribeToShard'. There is an open bug for this one up on github https://github.com/pplu/aws-sdk-perl/issues/371 and one I think I can fix up fairly eaisy.

    First things first, a little word on Kinesis. Well in short it touted as a very scalable real time data-stream thingy that sings dances and basically makes you line much better. Myself I do not havea use for it but it is part of the system and there is a bug so in I go.

    I first had to set things up on the AWS server side with some permission etc the usualal srtuff I also had to run a number of command top build up my Kineses system to a point where I can actually use the 'SubscribeToShard'

  • Important Changes in YAML::PP v0.019

    During the SUSE Hackweek 19 I found time to fix some bugs and make important changes in YAML::PP.

    Some of these changes might break code, but I expect this will be rare.

    As I see more and more CPAN modules using YAML::PP, I decided to make these changes as soon as possible.

    I will explain all changes and the reasons.

  • Introducing KBOS

    Starting even before Moose, we (in the Perl 5 world) have a plethora of Modules extending the syntax of the language with Perl 6 and more in mind. The following article sums up not only my 2 and a half cents on the subject but also an attempt to implement it. It should be of interest to anybody thinking about programming in general.

    As many here know, Kephra is the project closest to my heart and during the latest iteration, I decided to extend the language itself to get a more expressive, less repetitive code base. I want a fast, extendable type system with helpful error messages, real private attributes, real private methods, signatures with typed, positional, named and optional arguments, relaxed professional error handling, I want to know all instances of a class, reuse by delegation and incorporate any foreign objects. Last not least should the system support me in marshalling all attributes, so I can fully restore a program state after restart or switch into a remote session / other window.

    The Kephra Base Object System (KBOS - read: ok boss) is designed to deliver on all that and I just want to discuss here my decisions. Some seem to be strange, like no inheritance (a feature), class types (not even Raku has them) or 4 different method scopes. But hej its my pile of garbage, stay away. I want this to become the optimal object system for Kephra's needs. It is not clear to me if I will release it or parts as a separate distribution in future.

  • Postponing some feature removals in Python 3.9

    Python 2 was officially "retired" on the last day of 2019, so no bugs will be fixed or changes made in that version of the language, at least by the core developers—distributions and others will continue for some time to come. But there are lots of Python projects that still support Python 2.7 and may not be ready for an immediate clean break. Some changes that were made for the upcoming Python 3.9 release (which is currently scheduled for October) are causing headaches because support for long-deprecated 2.7-compatibility features is being dropped. That led to a discussion on the python-dev mailing list about postponing those changes to give a bit more time to projects that want to drop Python 2.7 support soon, but not immediately.

    There will actually be one final release of Python 2, Python 2.7.18, in April. It is something of a celebratory release that will be made in conjunction with PyCon. There were some fixes that accumulated in the branch between the 2.7.17 release in October and the end of the year, so those fixes will be flushed and the branch retired. Other than the release itself, no other changes will be allowed for that branch in 2020.

  • SUSE Hack Week Spotlight: Guerrilla AI Team

    SUSE Hack Week is a week-long sprint permitting developers time off from their day jobs to work on something entirely of their own design or wishes. This week we will be showcasing some of the amazing projects coming out of SUSE Hack Week and the brilliant minds behind them. Stay tuned all week long for more features.

More in Tux Machines

Python Programming

  • Integrating MongoDB with Python Using PyMongo

    In this post, we will dive into MongoDB as a data store from a Python perspective. To that end, we'll write a simple script to showcase what we can achieve and any benefits we can reap from it. Web applications, like many other software applications, are powered by data. The organization and storage of this data are important as they dictate how we interact with the various applications at our disposal. The kind of data handled can also have an influence on how we undertake this process. Databases allow us to organize and store this data, while also controlling how we store, access, and secure the information.

  • EuroPython 2020: Presenting our conference logo for Dublin

    The logo is inspired by the colors and symbols often associated with Ireland: the shamrock and the Celtic harp. It was again created by our designer Jessica Peña Moro from Simétriko, who had already helped us in previous years with the conference design.

  • Finding the Perfect Python Code Editor

    Find your perfect Python development setup with this review of Python IDEs and code editors. Writing Python using IDLE or the Python REPL is great for simple things, but not ideal for larger programming projects. With this course you’ll get an overview of the most common Python coding environments to help you make an informed decision.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #408 (Feb. 18, 2020)
  • Airflow By Example (II)
  • PyCon: The Hatchery Returns with Nine Events!

    Since its start in 2018, the PyCon US Hatchery Program has become a fundamental part of how PyCon as a conference adapts to best serve the Python community as it grows and changes with time. In keeping with that focus on innovation, the Hatchery Program itself has continued to evolve. Initially we wanted to gauge community interest for this type of program, and in 2018 we launched our first trial program to learn more about what kind of events the community might propose. At the end of that inaugural program, we accepted the PyCon Charlas as our first Hatchery event and it has grown into a permanent track offered at PyCon US.

  • Using "python -m" in Wing 7.2

    Wing version 7.2 has been released, and the next couple Wing Tips look at some of its new features. We've already looked at reformatting with Black and YAPF and Wing 7.2's expanded support for virtualenv. Now let's look at how to set up debugging modules that need to be launched with python -m. This command line option for Python allows searching the Python Path for the name of a module or package, and then loading and executing it. This capability was introduced way back in Python 2.4, and then extended in Python 2.5 through PEP 338 . However, it only came into widespread use relatively recently, for example to launch venv, black, or other command line tools that are shipped as Python packages.

  • New Python Programmer? Learn These Concepts First.

    As a novice Python developer, the world is your oyster with regards to the type of applications that you can create. Despite its age (30 years—an eternity in tech-world terms), Python remains a dominant programming language, with companies using it for all kinds of services, platforms, and applications. For example, Python lets you create web applications via Django or other frameworks such as Flask. Perhaps you want to create games instead? For that, learn Pygame for 2D games (or Panda3D for 3D). Or maybe you’re more enterprise-minded, and want to create useful utilities (such as automatically cataloguing e-books); in that case, Python works well with frameworks and software such as Calibre.

Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: Void Linux-based Project Trident 20.02, LINUX Unplugged, Linux Headlines and Tom Christie on Django

  • Project Trident 20.02 overview | A c based desktop-focused operating system

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Project Trident 20.02 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Project Trident 20.02 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Project Trident 20.0, now based on Void Linux. 

  • Long Term Rolling | LINUX Unplugged 341

    We question the very nature of Linux development, and debate if a new approach is needed. Plus an easy way to snapshot any workstation, some great feedback, and an extra nerdy command-line pick.

  • 2020-02-18 | Linux Headlines

    Red Hat moves up Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For list, Mozilla releases significant changes to its WebThings Gateway, and O’Reilly publishes analytics for its online learning platform.

  • Podcast.__init__: APIs, Sustainable Open Source and The Async Web With Tom Christie

    Tom Christie is probably best known as the creator of Django REST Framework, but his contributions to the state the web in Python extend well beyond that. In this episode he shares his story of getting involved in web development, his work on various projects to power the asynchronous web in Python, and his efforts to make his open source contributions sustainable. This was an excellent conversation about the state of asynchronous frameworks for Python and the challenges of making a career out of open source.

Mozilla: WebRender, Dexterity in Depth, WebThings and Departure of Ronaldo Lemos

  • Mozilla GFX: Challenge: Snitch on the glitch! Help the Graphics team track down an interesting WebRender bug…

    For the past little while, we have been tracking some interesting WebRender bugs that people are reporting in release. Despite best efforts, we have been unable to determine clear steps to reproduce these issues and have been unable to find a fix for them. Today we are announcing a special challenge to the community – help us track down steps to reproduce (a.k.a STR) for this bug and you will win some special, limited edition Firefox Graphics team swag! Read on for more details if you are interested in participating.

  • Mike Hoye: Dexterity In Depth

    I’m exactly one microphone and one ridiculous haircut away from turning into Management Shingy when I get rolling on stuff like this, because it’s just so clear to me how much this stuff matters and how little sense I might be making at the same time. Is your issue tracker automatically flagging your structural blind spots? Do your QA and UX team run your next reorg? Why not? This all started life as a rant on Mastodon, so bear with me here. There are two empirically-established facts that organizations making software need to internalize. The first is that by wide margin the most significant predictive indicator that there will be a future bug in a piece of software is the relative orgchart distance of the people working on it. People who are working on a shared codebase in the same room but report to different VPs are wildly more likely to introduce errors into a codebase than two people who are on opposite sides of the planet and speak different first languages but report to the same manager. The second is that the number one predictor that a bug will be resolved is if it is triaged correctly – filed in the right issue tracker, against the right component, assigned to the right people – on the first try. It’s fascinating that neither of the strongest predictive indicators of the most important parts of a bug’s lifecycle – birth and death – actually take place on the developers’ desk, but it’s true. In terms of predictive power, nothing else in the software lifecycle comes close.

  • WebThings Gateway Goes Global

    Today, we’re releasing version 0.11 of the WebThings Gateway. For those of you running a previous version of our Raspberry Pi build, you should have already received the update. You can check in your UI by navigating to Settings ➡ Add-ons.

  • Thank You, Ronaldo Lemos

    Ronaldo Lemos joined the Mozilla Foundation board almost six years ago. Today he is stepping down in order to turn his attention to the growing Agora! social movement in Brazil. Over the past six years, Ronaldo has helped Mozilla and our allies advance the cause of a healthy internet in countless ways. Ronaldo played a particularly important role on policy issues including the approval of the Marco Civil in Brazil and shaping debates around net neutrality and data protection. More broadly, he brought his experience as an academic, lawyer and active commentator in the fields of intellectual property, technology and culture to Mozilla at a time when we needed to step up on these topics in an opinionated way. As a board member, Ronaldo also played a critical role in the development of Mozilla Foundation’s movement building strategy. As the Foundation evolved it’s programs over the past few years, he brought to bear extensive experience with social movements in general — and with the open internet movement in particular. This was an invaluable contribution.

Komikku is a GTK Manga App for Linux

If you read a lot of manga and you use the Ubuntu desktop check out Komikku, a relatively new Manga reader app for Linux written in Python and GTK. Now, usually when I highlight a GTK app on this blog you’d assume that I’m talking about a desktop app. But with GTK apps now running on mobile (like the Librem 5, for instance) a new breed of Linux software is emerging, built with mobile first use cases in mind. And Komikku is one such app. Alex, aka BabyWogue, aka the Linux YouTube guy who uses a robot voice and anime wallpaper in every video, recently shared a concise video overview of Komikku (it’s how I heard about it in the first place) and how it runs on …a desktop... Read more Also: BingWall is —Yes, a Bing Wallpaper App for Ubuntu