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today's leftovers

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  • F2FS Root File-System Support For Clear Linux Appears To Be Coming

    Clear Linux looks poised to join the ranks of the few Linux distributions allowing it to run off an F2FS root file-system.

    There recently has been some mailing list discussions and patches proposed for adding F2FS root file-system support to Clear Linux and also exposing it as a file-system option in the Clear installer. Not many Linux distributions yet offer F2FS as an easy-to-enable option for the root file-system.

  • TURNIP Open-Source Adreno Vulkan Driver Adds A618 Support, Sysmem Rendering

    While the open-source Intel "ANV" and Radeon "RADV" Vulkan drivers get talked about a lot, one of the lesser known Vulkan drivers within Mesa is Turnip but it's been gaining steam recently.

    Turnip is the open-source Vulkan driver for Qualcomm Adreno graphics hardware and basically falls into the Freedreno umbrella. With Freedreno Gallium3D for OpenGL being in very good shape, we are finally seeing more activity on Turnip both by Google engineers and community developers.

  • How to Install Odoo 13 on Ubuntu 18.04 with Nginx – AWS
  • Digging up IP addresses with the Linux dig command
  • Proton 5.0-2 Released To Fix Crashes For Steam Play Linux Gamers

    Proton 5.0-2 is out with fixes over last week's big Proton 5.0-1 release that brought many features to this Wine 5.0 downstream focused on powering Valve's Steam Play for running Windows games nicely on Linux.

    Proton 5.0-1 was their first release in moving from Wine 4.11 to the stable Wine 5.0 along with enabling DXVK's Direct3D 9 by default, updates to DXVK and FAudio, and many other changes. With all the changes at play, to little surprise there is this point release out now focused on addressing the early fall-out.

  • Meetup Debian Toulouse

    My company Viveris is opening its office for hosting a Debian Meetup in Toulouse this summer (June 5th or June 12th).

    Everyone is welcome to this event, we're currently looking for volunteers for presenting demo, lightning talks or conferences (following the talks any kind of hacking session is possible like bugs triaging, coding sprints etc).

  • Code a Kung-Fu Master style beat-’em-up | Wireframe #32

    Punch and kick your way through a rabble of bad dudes in a simple scrolling beat-’em-up. Mark Vanstone shows you how

  • Class action lawsuit filed against two Puerto Rican hospitals for alleged ransomware attacks [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The alleged ransomware attacks, which took place in February last year at the Pavía Hospital Santurce and Pavía Hospital Hato Rey hospitals, affected 305,737 people, according to Department of Health and Human Services records. The plaintiffs, both former patients of the hospitals, allege patients’ personal identifying information, including full names, addresses, dates of birth, gender, financial information, and social security numbers, were exposed as a result of the attacks. These records also constitute protected health information as designated by HIPAA.

  • An Open-Source Bootloader For Windows Lets You Run Off Btrfs, Other Possibilities

    Quibble is a new open-source bootloader that supports booting Windows XP through Windows 10 and opens up new possibilities like booting a Windows installation off Btrfs.

  • UMG Confirm Elton John, Nirvana, Beck Recordings Were Lost or Damaged in Vault Fire

    The revelation appeared in a new filing in the ongoing class action lawsuit against UMG on behalf of artists seeking damages related to the fire. It marks the first public confirmation of specific artists who lost recordings in the fire following a New York Times Magazine report last year that detailed the potential extent of the damages. The list also includes …And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead, Bryan Adams, David Baerwald, Jimmy Eat World, Les Paul, Peter Frampton, Michael McDonald, Slayer, Sonic Youth, Suzanne Vega, Surfaris, White Zombie and Y&T.

    The filing itself pertains to disputes over discovery in the class action suit, with lawyers for the artists seeking to obtain a complete list of damaged recordings. Lawyers for the artists cited a document that UMG filed back when it was quietly pursuing litigation and insurance claims after the fire that included “17,000 unique artist names on the list of purportedly lost original music recordings.” UMG, in turn, said that list merely “identified myriad potentially lost assets,” including materials that aren’t original master recordings. The label did, however, name 19 artists whose material was either damaged or destroyed in the fire.

More in Tux Machines

Python Programming

  • Integrating MongoDB with Python Using PyMongo

    In this post, we will dive into MongoDB as a data store from a Python perspective. To that end, we'll write a simple script to showcase what we can achieve and any benefits we can reap from it. Web applications, like many other software applications, are powered by data. The organization and storage of this data are important as they dictate how we interact with the various applications at our disposal. The kind of data handled can also have an influence on how we undertake this process. Databases allow us to organize and store this data, while also controlling how we store, access, and secure the information.

  • EuroPython 2020: Presenting our conference logo for Dublin

    The logo is inspired by the colors and symbols often associated with Ireland: the shamrock and the Celtic harp. It was again created by our designer Jessica Peña Moro from Simétriko, who had already helped us in previous years with the conference design.

  • Finding the Perfect Python Code Editor

    Find your perfect Python development setup with this review of Python IDEs and code editors. Writing Python using IDLE or the Python REPL is great for simple things, but not ideal for larger programming projects. With this course you’ll get an overview of the most common Python coding environments to help you make an informed decision.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #408 (Feb. 18, 2020)
  • Airflow By Example (II)
  • PyCon: The Hatchery Returns with Nine Events!

    Since its start in 2018, the PyCon US Hatchery Program has become a fundamental part of how PyCon as a conference adapts to best serve the Python community as it grows and changes with time. In keeping with that focus on innovation, the Hatchery Program itself has continued to evolve. Initially we wanted to gauge community interest for this type of program, and in 2018 we launched our first trial program to learn more about what kind of events the community might propose. At the end of that inaugural program, we accepted the PyCon Charlas as our first Hatchery event and it has grown into a permanent track offered at PyCon US.

  • Using "python -m" in Wing 7.2

    Wing version 7.2 has been released, and the next couple Wing Tips look at some of its new features. We've already looked at reformatting with Black and YAPF and Wing 7.2's expanded support for virtualenv. Now let's look at how to set up debugging modules that need to be launched with python -m. This command line option for Python allows searching the Python Path for the name of a module or package, and then loading and executing it. This capability was introduced way back in Python 2.4, and then extended in Python 2.5 through PEP 338 . However, it only came into widespread use relatively recently, for example to launch venv, black, or other command line tools that are shipped as Python packages.

  • New Python Programmer? Learn These Concepts First.

    As a novice Python developer, the world is your oyster with regards to the type of applications that you can create. Despite its age (30 years—an eternity in tech-world terms), Python remains a dominant programming language, with companies using it for all kinds of services, platforms, and applications. For example, Python lets you create web applications via Django or other frameworks such as Flask. Perhaps you want to create games instead? For that, learn Pygame for 2D games (or Panda3D for 3D). Or maybe you’re more enterprise-minded, and want to create useful utilities (such as automatically cataloguing e-books); in that case, Python works well with frameworks and software such as Calibre.

Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: Void Linux-based Project Trident 20.02, LINUX Unplugged, Linux Headlines and Tom Christie on Django

  • Project Trident 20.02 overview | A c based desktop-focused operating system

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Project Trident 20.02 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Project Trident 20.02 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Project Trident 20.0, now based on Void Linux. 

  • Long Term Rolling | LINUX Unplugged 341

    We question the very nature of Linux development, and debate if a new approach is needed. Plus an easy way to snapshot any workstation, some great feedback, and an extra nerdy command-line pick.

  • 2020-02-18 | Linux Headlines

    Red Hat moves up Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For list, Mozilla releases significant changes to its WebThings Gateway, and O’Reilly publishes analytics for its online learning platform.

  • Podcast.__init__: APIs, Sustainable Open Source and The Async Web With Tom Christie

    Tom Christie is probably best known as the creator of Django REST Framework, but his contributions to the state the web in Python extend well beyond that. In this episode he shares his story of getting involved in web development, his work on various projects to power the asynchronous web in Python, and his efforts to make his open source contributions sustainable. This was an excellent conversation about the state of asynchronous frameworks for Python and the challenges of making a career out of open source.

Mozilla: WebRender, Dexterity in Depth, WebThings and Departure of Ronaldo Lemos

  • Mozilla GFX: Challenge: Snitch on the glitch! Help the Graphics team track down an interesting WebRender bug…

    For the past little while, we have been tracking some interesting WebRender bugs that people are reporting in release. Despite best efforts, we have been unable to determine clear steps to reproduce these issues and have been unable to find a fix for them. Today we are announcing a special challenge to the community – help us track down steps to reproduce (a.k.a STR) for this bug and you will win some special, limited edition Firefox Graphics team swag! Read on for more details if you are interested in participating.

  • Mike Hoye: Dexterity In Depth

    I’m exactly one microphone and one ridiculous haircut away from turning into Management Shingy when I get rolling on stuff like this, because it’s just so clear to me how much this stuff matters and how little sense I might be making at the same time. Is your issue tracker automatically flagging your structural blind spots? Do your QA and UX team run your next reorg? Why not? This all started life as a rant on Mastodon, so bear with me here. There are two empirically-established facts that organizations making software need to internalize. The first is that by wide margin the most significant predictive indicator that there will be a future bug in a piece of software is the relative orgchart distance of the people working on it. People who are working on a shared codebase in the same room but report to different VPs are wildly more likely to introduce errors into a codebase than two people who are on opposite sides of the planet and speak different first languages but report to the same manager. The second is that the number one predictor that a bug will be resolved is if it is triaged correctly – filed in the right issue tracker, against the right component, assigned to the right people – on the first try. It’s fascinating that neither of the strongest predictive indicators of the most important parts of a bug’s lifecycle – birth and death – actually take place on the developers’ desk, but it’s true. In terms of predictive power, nothing else in the software lifecycle comes close.

  • WebThings Gateway Goes Global

    Today, we’re releasing version 0.11 of the WebThings Gateway. For those of you running a previous version of our Raspberry Pi build, you should have already received the update. You can check in your UI by navigating to Settings ➡ Add-ons.

  • Thank You, Ronaldo Lemos

    Ronaldo Lemos joined the Mozilla Foundation board almost six years ago. Today he is stepping down in order to turn his attention to the growing Agora! social movement in Brazil. Over the past six years, Ronaldo has helped Mozilla and our allies advance the cause of a healthy internet in countless ways. Ronaldo played a particularly important role on policy issues including the approval of the Marco Civil in Brazil and shaping debates around net neutrality and data protection. More broadly, he brought his experience as an academic, lawyer and active commentator in the fields of intellectual property, technology and culture to Mozilla at a time when we needed to step up on these topics in an opinionated way. As a board member, Ronaldo also played a critical role in the development of Mozilla Foundation’s movement building strategy. As the Foundation evolved it’s programs over the past few years, he brought to bear extensive experience with social movements in general — and with the open internet movement in particular. This was an invaluable contribution.

Komikku is a GTK Manga App for Linux

If you read a lot of manga and you use the Ubuntu desktop check out Komikku, a relatively new Manga reader app for Linux written in Python and GTK. Now, usually when I highlight a GTK app on this blog you’d assume that I’m talking about a desktop app. But with GTK apps now running on mobile (like the Librem 5, for instance) a new breed of Linux software is emerging, built with mobile first use cases in mind. And Komikku is one such app. Alex, aka BabyWogue, aka the Linux YouTube guy who uses a robot voice and anime wallpaper in every video, recently shared a concise video overview of Komikku (it’s how I heard about it in the first place) and how it runs on …a desktop... Read more Also: BingWall is —Yes, a Bing Wallpaper App for Ubuntu