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Blender 2.80

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The second update of the Blender 2.80 milestone release is here!

With again over a thousand fixes and several important updates that were planned for the 2.8 series. In this release you will find UDIM and USD support, MantaFlow fluids and smoke simulation, AI denoising, Grease Pencil improvements, and much more!

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Also: Blender 2.82 Released with AI Denoiser for Nvidia RTX GPUs, More

Blender 2.82 Released With Many Improvements, 1000+ Fixes

Blender 2.82 Released with UDIM, USD Support

  • Blender 2.82 Released with UDIM, USD Support

    Blender 2.82 was released as the second update for the 2.80 series. The snap package has been updated for Ubuntu 18.04 and higher.

    Blender 2.82 comes with over a thousand fixes and several important updates. Changes in the new release include

A Quick Look At The Blender 2.82 Performance On Intel + AMD CPUs

  • A Quick Look At The Blender 2.82 Performance On Intel + AMD CPUs

    With Blender 2.82 having released on Friday, this weekend we've begun our benchmarking of this new Blender release as the leading open-source 3D modeling solution currently available. Here are some preliminary v2.81 vs. v2.82 figures on different higher-end Intel and AMD processors.

    This is just a quick look at how we're seeing the Blender 2.82 performance on a number of distinct systems for comparing the old and new releases as well as a rough look at how these various Intel and AMD processors are comparing.

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