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My MiniSlack Memoirs

I knew when I published my MiniSlack review that I might get some unkind comments, and I thought I was prepared. By the end of the day I guess I wasn't. Most were personally insulting. I thought one poster was going to be helpful and constructive, but his final post drove me to disable comments and delete the posts made. A regretfully impulsive decision, but nothing I can do about it now.

I received a private message from one gentleman who may have been disappointed by my results, but at least he was respectful, professional, and helpful. He has provoked this commentary.

Many times over the years when my favorite distro was attacked and called little more than fertilizer, I took the stance: Some distros work well on some hardware combinations and not so well on others. I firmly believe that. That's why a distro will appear almost perfect to one individual while seeming like buggy crap to another.

I have no doubt this is the case with MiniSlack. I rarely find a distro that has problems with my vanilla older hardware. I have nothing fancy or obscure. But I'm sure it happens. I frequently have to use acpi=off or nolapic.

In response to suggestions, and I post here for Claus and those who missed my original post due to the sudden deletion. I did retry a fresh download, md5sum'd, fresh burn on quality medium and installed to a virgin partition. My results were no better this round. This was my third install in efforts to put out a positive review. I tried to mention the good things with MiniSlack as well as the bad as in all of my reviews. I list the good with the bad.

I'm sorry my review ended abruptly on such a sour note, but the end of that day I had become highly frustrated with my fruitless efforts. I must stand by my results - but I will qualify it by saying 'Some distros work well on some hardware combinations and not so good on others.'

Thank you Claus for your contact and will take your words under advisement.

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