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Q4OS 4.0 Gemini, testing

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GNU
Linux

We are happy to kick off development cycle of the Q4OS 4, the brand new major version codenamed 'Gemini'. The Debian 'Bullseye' development branch underlies Q4OS Gemini, which will be in development until Debian Bullseye becomes stable, and it's planned to be supported for five years from the official release date. Unlike previous installation media, Q4OS Gemini live media carries the full desktop software bundle, however a user can ask the Desktop profiler tool to strip the target system into one of predefined so called 'Software profiles' throughout the installation process.

Feel free to download and try the new version out, bugs and glitches reporting would be very welcome, live bootable media are immediately available for download from the dedicated Testing releases page.

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Q4OS 4.0 “Gemini” Enters Development Based on Debian GNU/Linux 1

  • Q4OS 4.0 “Gemini” Enters Development Based on Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye”

    For a long time, Q4OS has tried to keep the spirit of the old-school KDE 3.5 desktop environment series alive by shipping with the awesome Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE) by default. But the current stable series, Q4OS 3.x “Centaurus”, also includes the more modern KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment alongside TDE to give users more options for tailoring their PCs to their needs.

    Based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye” operating system series, Q4OS 4.0 “Gemini” is now in development and uses the KDE Plasma 5.14.5 desktop environment by default. Therefore, it is using software packages from the Debian Testing repositories.

Q4OS 4.0 Testing Run Through

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