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NVIDIA 440.58.01 Linux Driver

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • NVIDIA 440.58.01 Linux Driver Fixes Vulkan Game Crashes, New Extensions

    Not scheduled to go live until Monday but up this weekend is the NVIDIA 440.58.01 Linux beta driver that offers a few Vulkan updates.

    The NVIDIA 440.58.01 Linux driver fixes a regression that caused some Vulkan games to crash due to swapchain issues. Affected games include at least F1 2017, Rise of the Tomb Raider, and DiRT 4. This beta driver also fixes a visual glitching issue when falling out of page-flipping such as alt-tabbing on Linux.

  • NVIDIA have a new Vulkan Beta driver out for Linux fixing some regressions

    NVIDIA continue being quick to advance their Vulkan drivers as today they released an update to their special Beta branch.

    440.58.01 is out which adds in support for two more Vulkan extensions with VK_KHR_shader_non_semantic_info and VK_EXT_tooling_info which sounds quite useful to help developers track down what might be causing an error.

    For games this release fixes up a Vulkan swapchain recreation crash with F1 2017, Rise of the Tomb Raider and DiRT 4. NVIDIA also solved an issue with visual glitching of Vulkan applications when "falling out of flipping" with an example being when you alt+tab, however they're still investigating an issue to do with this on the GNOME desktop.

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Games: Jumpala, NVIDIA and More

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