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Programming: Wind River's CI/CD, Mint, Python and Java

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Development
  • Wind River Launches CD Platform for Embedded Systems

    Glenn Seiler, vice president for open source strategy for Wind River, said the CD platform is based on an open source instance of the Jenkins continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) platform. The company envisions organizations downloading the platform as source code that Wind River will update regularly for use on top of the Wind River Linux platform, he said.

    Wind River is taking advantage of containers, Kubernetes, the Puppet IT automation framework and a repository to ease deployment of its CD platform, added Seiler. The company is committed to providing updates to that platform, which Wind River uses internally, at least every three weeks, said Seiler.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Mint

    Mint is a programming language for the front-end web that aims to solve the common issues of Single Page Applications (SPAs) at a language level.

     It is a compiler and a framework combined to provide great developer experience while allowing users to write safe, readable and maintainable code, according to the developers behind the project.

    The common issues that it attempts to fix are regard reusable components, styling routing, global and local state handling, and synchronous and asynchronous computations that might fail.

    “It was born out of the frustration of the JavaScript language and ecosystem (NPM) and the Elm language and it’s not so open development practices,” Mint said on its website. “Mint aims to combine the developer experience of Elm and the expressiveness of React to create the perfect language for building single-page applications.”

  • PyPy and CFFI have moved to Heptapod

    It has been a very busy month, not so much because of deep changes in the JIT of PyPy but more around the development, deployment, and packaging of the project.

  • Your Guide to Reading Excel (xlsx) Files in Python

    In this brief Python tutorial, we are going to learn how to read Excel (xlsx) files using Python. Specifically, we will read xlsx files in Python using the Python module openpyxl. First, we start by the simplest example of reading a xlsx file in Python. Second, we will learn how to read multiple Excel files using Python.

  • CausalNex: An open-source Python library that helps data scientists to infer causation rather than observing correlation

    CausalNex is a Python library that allows data scientists and domain experts to co-develop models that go beyond correlation and consider causal relationships. ‘CasualNex’ provides a practical ‘what if’ library which is deployed to test scenarios using Bayesian Networks (BNs).

  • Programming languages: Java developers flock to Kotlin and ditch Oracle JDK for OpenJDK [Ed: CBS tabloid ZDNet does puff pieces for Snyk now. A Microsoft-connected attack dog -- one  which badmouths FOSS and now pretends to have a 'study' (self-promotion stunt) on programming trends...]

    The vast majority of developers who use a JVM (Java Virtual Machine) language still use Java, but a sizable chunk of the population is shifting to Kotlin, a JVM-compatible language developed by JetBrains, which Google is encouraging developers to use for Android development.  

Announcing Zydeco

  • Announcing Zydeco

    Moops had a memorable name, and I think the naming really helped it gain a following. MooX::Pression was just meh. So now it's Zydeco. Zydeco is a fun word and pretty short to type. It's a musical genre that blends jazz, blues, and Louisiana French Creole, and it just seemed like a good fit for a module that takes what I feel are some of the coolest features of Perl programming, and blends them together under one syntax.

IDEs

  • software development programming – dev – choosing the right Text Editor Editor / Debugger / GUI IDE

    Of course just as programming languages every IDE was build by users for a specific purpose and it might serve this purpose well while doing additional stuff while.

    There is not a single tool that „does it all“ and it would be completely against the UNIX philosophy of: build small tools that do one task – but do it well – that can be linked/networked together (most common interface: pipe text streams)

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